WUFT News

FDOT Grants Citrus County $1.5 Million to Make Curvy Roads Safer

By on March 11th, 2014
Several roads in Citrus County were found to be the site of 185 crashes in the past three years by the Florida Department of Transportation. The county was selected to receive a $1.5 million grant to improve the safety of 141 curves on county roads.

Florida Department of Transportation

Several roads in Citrus County were found to be the site of 185 crashes in the past three years by the Florida Department of Transportation. The county was selected to receive a $1.5 million grant to improve the safety of 141 curves on county roads.

Nicholas Tarr was a midshipman on leave from the U.S. Naval Academy when he died in Inverness on Aug. 9, 2012.

Tarr, 21, was driving on Old Floral City Road when he failed to recognize a curve. His car hit a tree and split in two, throwing Tarr from his 2003 Lincoln sedan.

The curves in Citrus County roads are well-known dangers in the community. Roads particularly difficult to navigate will have an opportunity to become safer with improvements installed this summer, according to a Citrus County press release.

In February, the Florida Department of Transportation selected Citrus County to receive a $1.5-million grant to improve the safety of 141 curves on county roads. The safety installations include curve warning signs with solar-powered speed feedback signs, retro-reflective pavement markers along the curve edge lines and chevron signs, which feature arrows indicating a curve.

Areas that will receive improvements include Lecanto Highway, Pleasant Grove Road, Citrus Avenue, Withlacoochee Trail, Old Floral City Road, Fort Island Trail, Homosassa Trail, Ozello Trail and Gobbler Drive.

These nine roads were part of a study completed in 2012 by the FDOT. According to the study, these areas were chosen because of the number of crashes that have occurred there in recent years.

The areas that were studied by the FDOT were the site of 185 crashes in the past three years with a total of 156 injuries and two fatalities, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

Kris Carson, an FDOT spokeswoman, said Citrus County was awarded the grant because of the results of this study.

“The whole goal is to reduce lane-departure crashes, and we’re finding that a lot of these happen on roads with curves,” Carson said.

The FDOT normally handles state roads, but because of the Citrus County study they were able to recognize the needs of local roads.

“Whenever we can take different grant money and help the locals make their roads safer, that’s something we definitely want to do,” Carson said.

Citrus County is the first of the five counties in its FDOT district – which also includes Hernando, Hillsborough, Pasco and Pinellas counties – to receive safety improvements, according to Carson. The other counties will also receive grants.

Tobey Phillips, public information officer and a lifelong resident of Citrus County, said these roads could be difficult to navigate if the driver is unfamiliar with the curves.

Phillips said this grant was a pleasant surprise for Citrus County because no action was taken by the county to receive it. It is in the budget now, and because of the grant, the city gets the chance to make the necessary improvements.

“It’s huge to us because we know it needs to be done,” Phillips said.

Kitty Hicks, an employee at Wayne’s Citrus Cycles in Floral City, said roads such as Fort Island Trail, Ozello Trail and Gobbler Road are long, curvy and very popular for riding motorcycles.

Hicks, who enjoys riding these trails with her husband, said these safety improvements will mean a lot.

“Any visible markings for a motorcyclist to see will make a huge difference,” she said.


This entry was posted in Local and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Local

Teacher Conference Aims to Bring Global Perspective Into Classrooms

Gainesville Connected, a conference in Gainesville, aims to equip teachers to engage students on global issues such as poverty.


Anna Claire (left) and Katie Scarlett (right) are two capuchin monkeys that were once pets but now live in the Jungle Friends Primate Sanctuary. Scarlett is blind and Claire is diabetic.

Primate Sanctuaries Feel Stresses of Insufficient Funding

Sanctuaries are struggling to take in primates as researchers and pet owners forgo euthanasia for better homes.


Oct. 23, 2014: Afternoon News in 90

A video roundup of local, state and national stories for readers in North Central Florida.


The Ocala City Council voted not to renew Matthew Brower's contract as city manager on Tuesday. Brower's current contract will expire on Dec. 21.

Ocala City Manager’s Contract Not Renewed

The request to reappoint Matthew Brower as Ocala’s city manager was rejected on a three-to-two vote by the Ocala City Council. Brower was appointed city manager in February 2011, and his contract will now expire on Dec. 21.


Victoria Rusinov administers FluMist to a child at the Control Flu clinic at Littlewood Elementary School.

CDC Studies Effects of Nasal Spray Flu Vaccine Over Traditional Shot for Children

Recent studies suggests a nasal spray form of the flu vaccine is more effective than the flu shot in healthy children ages 2 to 8, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments