UF College of Veterinary Medicine Hires New Dean

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The University of Florida’s College of Veterinary Medicine has officially named Dr. Dana Zimmel as the school’s new dean.

Zimmel has served the role in an interim capacity since December of 2019 when the former dean, Dr. James W. Lloyd, retired after six years in the position.

In a statement released by the University of Florida Tuesday morning, it said Zimmel’s work to keep faculty, students and staff safe during the pandemic and further the status of the ninth-ranked veterinary college during her 18 months in the role were contributing factors in the decision.

“During the past year and a half, Dana has worked tirelessly with her leadership team to ensure the safety of the college’s faculty, staff and students, along with the successful continuance of its research, teaching and patient care missions. Her dedication and focus have been evident throughout this trying period,” the announcement said.

Before taking on the role of dean, Zimmel was the lead administrator of UF’s veterinary hospitals and worked as associate dean for its clinical services since 2015.  She also spent five years as the chief of staff and chief medical officer for the clinical enterprise before taking on her role as associate dean and lead administrator.

During her time leading the veterinary hospital, the hospital’s caseload more than doubled growing from 20,542 annual patients in 2011 to 41,811 patients in 2019.

Zimmel also completed part of her own education in Gainesville. She graduated from the College of Veterinary Medicine with a Bachelor of Science in Animal Science in 1990 and earned her Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from the college in 1995.

With the hire, Zimmel became the seventh permanent dean in the college’s 45-year existence.

About Alex Flanagan

Alex is a reporter for WUFT News who can be reached by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

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