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Tumblin Creek on 13th Street to see beauty again

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A dark green color flows down Tumblin Creek, along with empty bottles and other garbage. The once clear, blue water of the natural stream added to the beauty of Southwest 13th Street, but the stream is now littered and polluted.

The city’s Public Works department has received the go-ahead to start working on the water quality issues, with the Tumblin Creek Watershed Project. But the creek still needs a cleanup to restore its beauty, along with future care-taking so it doesn’t fall to state of pollution it is today.

Storm water runoff has overwhelmed this stretch of watershed over time.

“Well now it’s dirty and no one has been out to clean it out,” said Yvonne Bryant, a Days Inn employee. “There was a time when it was real beautiful and water was all full and we had the gators in, and customers used to come by to stop and take pictures of it, but now no one does that anymore.”

 

Rachel Jones edited this story online.

 

About Matt Sheehan

Matt can be reached by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

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