WUFT News

Center for Integrative Medicine opening at Shands

By on February 28th, 2013

For the last three decades, Shands Hospital at the University of Florida has set the foundation for using arts in medicine. This summer, the hospital will open its first Center for Integrative Medicine.

The Integrative Medicine Program will partner with UF’s College of Medicine and Shands’ Arts in Medicine program. The program started in the 1980s and has since grown to incorporate many different types of art and therapies for patients and employees at the hospital.

“Integrative medicine brings together medical science with complementary and alternative therapies,” said Jill Sonke, director of the UF Center for Arts in Medicine. “It bridges medical practice with disciplines like acupuncture, massage, tai chi, meditation, and yoga.”

This clinic will be the first of its kind at Shands. It will provide patients more opportunities to different techniques of healing, as well as the opportunity to receive these on an outpatient basis.

Shands’ Arts in Medicine program now provides patients with therapies like yoga and guided meditation on a bedside basis, but this new clinic will provide an expansion.

The Arts and Medicine yoga coordinator, Tammy Bernard, said research shows these practices give patients a better quality of life. Mindfulness, meditation and breathing techniques can actively be used to support a patient’s well-being, she said.

“I’ve seen in my own practice how patients respond so favorably to receiving this augmentation of practices,” Bernard said. “I’m just excited about how it’s going to unfold.”

Studies have shown integrative medicine can help patients with depression, anxiety, difficulties sleeping and pain management, she said.

The program is set to start in August, but this is not the only development for Arts in Medicine at UF. The program is in the process of trying to offer a master’s degree in Arts in Medicine. It will be an online curriculum focused on educating people to use the arts in a health care context.

Sonke said a master’s degree could attract many different students, including artists looking to work in health care environments and health care providers interested in using the arts to enhance their health practices.

The certificate of Arts in Medicine was launched last fall. Sonke said this growing field is very important to help humanize the stressful environment of the hospital, as well as give patients opportunities to express themselves. Sonke hopes to launch the master’s program in 2014.

Rebekah Geier edited this story online.


This entry was posted in Health and Science and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
  • Lee Ann Dodson

    I had the privilege of being the first artist in residence in the fledgling Arts in Medicine program and later was the director and artist for the Healing Wall Project at Shands from its inception in 1993 to its completion in June 1995. It is indeed wonderful that the Arts in Medicine program started primarily through the guidance and vision of Dr. John Graham-Pole and Mary Rockwood Lane, MSN, PhD has flourished and grown through the dedication and hard work of the many artists, volunteers, faculty, students, and staff over the last twenty years to become what it is today. Congratulations to all those involved in this very exciting new Center for Integrative Medicine!

    • susan Fusco-Fazio

      Amazing program!! I trained at Shands/UFL in a summer intensive in Arts in Medicine years ago and it was one of the most meaningful experiences in my life. I have been hoping for a masters program since this is just what I am looking for! Been searching for just the right one and have been waiting. Now I know why! I recall a beautiful program that offered theater improv for patients at the bedside called playback theater. We volunteered in it to learn and it was very powerful to see patients tell a bit of their story to a AIM volunteer and then they would interpret their story in a mine like performance. It was beautiful, moving the patients to emotion and gratitude. I met many gifted and compassionate people there. The program is blessed with a wonderful director- Jill Sonke!

 

More Stories in Health and Science

By leppyone (Nine-banded Armadillo) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Armadillos May Be Cause for Rising Leprosy Rates in Florida

Florida health officials are warning people to stay away from armadillos as they may be the cause of recent leprosy cases in the state. There have been nine cases reported in the last seven months, but none have been reported in Alachua.


Breastfeeding

Florida Hospitals Promote Breastfeeding

Hospitals around Florida are working to create initiatives to help mothers and future mothers with breastfeeding.The Florida Health Department connected with hospitals in 15 counties in June to participate in the Healthiest Weight Florida’s Baby Steps to Baby Friendly Initiative.


Tatum bicycles on the Hawthorne Trail with a group of 30 people from Gator Cycle and Body By Boris. Nicole Aedo / WUFT News

Former Addict Finds Purpose In Biking

Andrew Tatum battled multiple addictions with hard drugs and junk food. Now he finds peace and purpose in biking and blogging about his struggles in order to help others.


Nate Willingham focuses on matching three cards based on color, shape or pattern during his Brain Works session on Friday. This card game is used to improve visual perception.

Brain Training Center Treats Learning Disabilities

Brain Works in Gainesville uses auditory training to treat learning disabilities and brain trauma. It’s helped 13-year-old Nate with his dyslexia, dyscalculia and dysgraphia, but scientists question how effective the treatment really is.


UF Study Shows Grape Seed Oil Can Reduce Obesity

A new study has found that muscadine grape seed oil can help reduce obesity. Containing a vitamin E derivative, the oil can help prevent the formation of new fat cells.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments