WUFT News

Florida citrus crops drop

By on February 7th, 2013

A drop in Florida citrus crops could raise citrus prices, which would affect growers and consumers.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said the 2013 Florida citrus crops will drop at least 5 percent. For Florida, the main producer of citrus in the nation, this could pose a problem. But Thomas Spreen, University of Florida Professor Emeritus of Food and Resource Economics, said consumers don’t have to worry yet.

The crop forecast, which was released in October, predicted 156 million boxes of fruit, Spreen said. Although the number sounds high, it is less fruit than in the past.

The drop in citrus crops could be related to a disease known as Citrus Greening. Greening is when the trees tend to drop the fruit more quickly, Spreen said, and it is now more widespread within the state.

Other factors that could have attributed to the fruit dropping too soon are citrus canker and Florida’s  recent winter being very warm and dry, Spreen said.

UF, the USDA and citrus growers have been investing time and money to come up with various solutions to fight Greening. Spreen said UF has a “very aggressive” research program, which has proposed solutions that range from a disease-resistant, genetically modified tree, to killing the insects that spread disease and an antibiotic solution for the trees that would kill bacteria.

While this drop would cause consumers to pay more for citrus crops, growers would actually benefit from a smaller crop because prices rise in response.

Spreen doesn’t think prices will rise from what they have been.

“We might have seen somewhat of a price decline had a larger crop been produced,” he said.

Rebekah Geier wrote this story online.


This entry was posted in Florida and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Florida

photo

‘Pot Predicament’ Forum Fuels Amendment 2 Debate

A panel of four met to discuss Amendment 2 and medical marijuana at a Tuesday night forum on the University of Florida Campus. Alachua County Sheriff Sadie Darnell and former Florida House Speaker John Mills dominated the forum as they debated each other about legislation language and the need for medical marijuana.


The Ocala City Council repealed the so-called "saggy pants" ordinance at Ocala City Hall on Tuesday evening. The ordinance banned saggy pants on city property.

Ocala City Council Repeals ‘Saggy Pants’ Ordinance

The Ocala City Council voted to repeal an ordinance banning saggy pants on city property. The controversial ordinance met with criticism from the NAACP.


City of Hampton Kicks Off New Era with First Election In About a Decade

The city of Hampton holds its first election in about 10 years today after state lawmakers give local leaders a second chance instead of dissolving the city. Citizens will vote to fill city council seats and approve charter amendments.


Marty Washington, 57, of Gainesville, Florida walks by the City of Waldo Police Department on Wednesday, September 3. Waldo is under investigation by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement after being accused of issuing illegal ticket quotas for officers.

Steve Maynard Named Waldo’s Interim Police Chief

The Alachua County Sherriff’s Office has named Acting Captain Steve Maynard as Waldo’s new interim police chief, after the previous chief was accused of enacting illegal ticket quotas.


National Report, a satirical website, published a story stating Williston had signed a deal to replace the local police department with a privatized force. According to the article, the new police force would be "trained, managed, and wholly operated by Walmart."

Spoof Website Turns Attention to Williston Police Department

National Report, a satirical news website, drew attention to the Williston Police Department after publishing an article about a deal made with Walmart to supply the town with a new, privatized police force. Williston PD pointed out the satirical nature of the story on Facebook.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments