Home / The Point / The Point, July 24, 2019: The Effect Of Sea-Level Rise In Yankeetown, Florida

The Point, July 24, 2019: The Effect Of Sea-Level Rise In Yankeetown, Florida

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Today’s top stories

• Get to know the Gainesville Old-time Dance Society in this short video and story about the group that’s open to all who want to learn some new steps. (WUFT News)

• Areas from Gainesville toward the Gulf Coast in Dixie and Levy counties could see higher rainfall over the next few days as a front stalls. (Florida Storms)

• There’s no major health hazard as a result, but about 1.5 million gallons of treated wastewater drained into a sinkhole in Ocala over the weekend. (Ocala Star-Banner)

• WMFE in Orlando and the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting visited Yankeetown to see how that community is dealing with sea-level rise.

• The first phase of a renewed investigation at the former Dozier School site did not find any other human remains. (News Service of Florida)

• Palatka is getting help from the St. Johns River Water Management District to clean up its stormwater discharges into the St. Johns River. (WJCT)

• Politifact examines how often children in the Homestead migrant detention facility get to speak with their parents. It’s less than the allotted time that federal prisoners receive.

• A federal judge in South Florida has the option to throw out the original sentence levied against Jeffrey Epstein, even as a new case against him begins. (Palm Beach Post)

“You end up with gaps.” The Fort Myers News-Press investigated where around Florida the mental health treatment spending isn’t quite equal.

The Florida pension system is doing very well, even as pensions nationwide face a difficult future. (Florida Phoenix)


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From NPR News

• World: Brexit Supporters Get What They Wanted As Boris Johnson Becomes Prime Minister

• National: As Climate Changes, Taxpayers Will Shoulder Larger U.S. Payouts To Farmers

• National: Senate Approves Bill To Prevent Sept. 11 Victims’ Fund From Running Out Of Money

• Business: President Trump, Congress Reach 2-Year Budget Deal

• Business: Justice Department Begins Review Of Whether Big Tech Is Too Powerful

• Health: What Gets To Be A ‘Burger’? States Restrict Labels On Plant-Based Meat

• Science: Catching Sight Of A Rare Butterfly In A Surprising Refuge

• Politics: Justice Ginsburg: ‘I Am Very Much Alive’

About Ethan Magoc

Ethan is a journalist at WUFT News. He's a Pennsylvania native who found a home reporting Florida's stories. Reach him by emailing emagoc@wuft.org or calling 352-294-1525.

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