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Bound and gagged, woman escapes attack at Campus Lodge

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A woman who was bound and gagged early Tuesday morning fended off her attacker by kicking him and running to safety.

The attack took place around 2 a.m. in the Campus Lodge Apartments complex located at 2800 SW Williston Road.

Ben Tobias, spokesman for the Gainesville Police Department, said in an email the unidentified attacker wore all black clothing, a black mask and gloves.

Tobias said the woman was approached from behind while she got out of her car.

The attacker then put a gag over her mouth, covered her eyes with his hands and put what she believed was a handgun to her head.

While the victim’s car was the only one in the area, the attack occurred at a large apartment complex. Her car was also parked under a street light, which makes the attack that much more brazen, Tobias said.

The area is not prone to high levels of crime, and “that’s the strange part,” he said.

After being forced to the ground, the woman fought back by kicking her attacker and running to her apartment where her roommates helped her take off the bonds. She suffered minor scraps while escaping.

“Each case is going to be different, and we can’t, unfortunately, be in the mind and in the eyes of the person being attacked,” Tobias said. “Having a will to fight and a will to get away was definitely her best course of action that night.”

Tobias said GPD is concerned about the attack because such crimes normally happen in secluded areas.

“We don’t appreciate cowards that want to come in and prey on students after hours,” he said. “We’re going to do everything in our power to try and track this attacker down.

Casey Christ wrote this story online

About Casey Christ

Casey is a reporter for WUFT News and can be contacted by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

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