The Point, Oct. 17, 2022: Results from a new survey of Florida colleges and universities did not go as expected

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The stories near you

• WUFT News: Police K9 that mauled man’s eye quietly placed back on active duty. “The K9, named Ranger, had been temporarily removed from duty after community uproar over the arrest on July 10 of Terrell Bradley, 31, of Gainesville. Bradley lost his right eye after Ranger bit him while Bradley was hiding in bushes at an apartment complex.”

• WUFT News: A celebration of light comes to Celebration Pointe. “…more than 1,200 people visited Celebration Pointe in Gainesville on Saturday to celebrate the Indian Festival of Light, Diwali, for the first time ever. By the end of DiwaliFesr, many attendees seemed to have found a new sense of community.”

• WUFT News: Alachua Conservation Trust hosts second annual Pride at Prairie Creek. “The event celebrated the LGBT community, especially those within the conservation field. Alachua Conservation Trust (ACT) hosted the event at Prairie Creek Lodge in southeast Alachua County.”


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Around the state

• Fresh Take Florida: New surveys of Florida colleges, universities fail to support concerns over anti-conservative sentiment. “Concerned about what they worried was anti-conservative sentiment on college and university campuses, Gov. Ron DeSantis and Florida lawmakers ordered a survey of nearly 2 million students, faculty and staff across the state. Results are in, and they did not go as expected.”

• Associated Press: A juror in the Parkland shooting case says she felt threatened by another juror. “Prosecutor Carolyn McCann told Circuit Judge Elizabeth Scherer during a brief hearing that prosecutors are not trying to invalidate Thursday’s jury vote and reported the threat only for safety reasons and so the Broward County Sheriff’s Office can investigate.”

• Fort Myers News-Press ($): Some in Hertz Arena shelter don’t know what’s next, share stories of bitter cold, chaos inside. “As stories of the extra hardships people endured within Hertz Arena leaked to advocates organizing donations outside, Crystal Johnson, a community advocate in Fort Myers, said more city officials need to step up for displaced residents.”

• News Service of Florida: Jimmy Patronis, Adam Hattersley square off for Florida chief financial officer role. “Florida voters next month will choose a state chief financial officer who will have a big role in trying to reform the property-insurance system, as the industry faces an uncertain future exacerbated by billions of dollars in claims from Hurricane Ian.”

• Spectrum News: FEMA’s ‘cadre’ of reservists helping Florida recover from Ian. “As of now, FEMA is currently operating 13 disaster recovery centers in the Florida counties hardest hit by Hurricane Ian.”

• Palm Beach Post ($): New COVID omicron subvariants starting to grow in the southeastern U.S. “COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations statewide have sunk to levels not seen since before the summer surge caused by the BA.4 and BA.5 omicron subvariants, the federal government reported Friday. At the same time, more of those mutations, which the latest Pfizer and Moderna shots are better equipped to fight than their first versions, comprise a growing share of cases in the South.”

• Miami Herald ($): ‘You have my full support’: Top DeSantis aides played key role in migrant flights. “While the program was carried out by a private contractor, the new records show the deep involvement of Larry Keefe, DeSantis’ public safety czar, and James Uthmeier, his chief of staff, in an operation that has led to at least one criminal investigation, a separate U.S. Treasury Department probe and several lawsuits — potentially heightening their exposure to the various inquiries underway.”

• New York Times ($): When Segregationists Offered One-Way Tickets to Black Southerners. “When two planeloads of asylum seekers were flown to Martha’s Vineyard last month, Peola Denham Jr. recognized an echo of his own experience from six decades ago — one nearly forgotten in the long history of Black Americans’ struggle for civil rights.”

• NPR News: Palm trees in Florida weathered Hurricane Ian’s wrath just fine. “When a hurricane assaults the coast, as Ian did to Southwest Florida, flip on the TV and the images the cameras have to show are palm trees flailed by the furious winds. The obligatory footage is supposed to be visual evidence of nature’s fury. And that it is. But a palm tree standing up to a hurricane is just as much a symbol of the resilience of life, particularly so in Fort Myers, the City of Palms.”


From NPR News

• Business: It’s almost impossible to find a CEO who isn’t bracing for a recession

• World: Why you should pay attention to the Chinese Communist Party’s congress

• National: Yellowstone National Park has reopened an entrance devastated by June floods

• Science: Brain cells in a lab dish learn to play Pong — and offer a window onto intelligence

• Science: A black hole is releasing some strange burps, baffling scientists

• Arts: Emmett Till is known for his death. A new film about his mother also honors his life

• National: Eclipse the dog, known for riding the bus alone to the dog park, has died

Ethan Magoc curated today’s edition of The Point.

About WUFT News

Contact WUFT News by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news @wuft.org

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