Home / The Point / The Point, Nov. 22, 2019: Special Report: ‘The Battle Of Bone Valley’ Details Fight Over Union County Phosphate Mine

The Point, Nov. 22, 2019: Special Report: ‘The Battle Of Bone Valley’ Details Fight Over Union County Phosphate Mine

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• A massive legal battle is unfolding in tiny Union County over a pending phosphate mining plan. We have a narrative and a timeline to get you up to speed on the case’s twists during the past five years, as well as an explanation of what phosphate mining actually entails. (WUFT News)

• Some 9,000 meals were packed yesterday and are now ready to go to Alachua County families who are food insecure. Here’s what it took to make it happen. (WUFT News)

• The next chapter of a running disagreement between Alachua County and Gainesville city leaders was written last night about a proposed sports arena’s location. The county right now has its eyes on constructing it in Celebration Pointe, but the city would really like to shift that focus back toward downtown or East Gainesville. (WUFT News)

• Construction on the Gainesville Regional Airport’s larger airport terminal is officially underway after yesterday’s groundbreaking ceremony. (WUFT News)

• Union County schools yesterday held a training drill meant to prepare students for the aftermath of a school shooting — the parent reunification process. (WCJB)

• A Chicago-area medical marijuana company is planning to make a major investment in Ocala. (Ocala Star-Banner)

• Author and former University of Florida professor Ibram X. Kendi came back to Gainesville this week to discuss his new book, “Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America.” He broke it down at a library event with Gainesville’s mayor: “What a racist says is,” he said, referring to haves and have nots, “the group has more because they are more. And what an anti-racist says is, it’s because of racist policy.” (WUFT News)

• The state senator who helped pass Florida’s anti-sanctuary cities law is touting its effects, which we detailed yesterday in our story about one immigrant, Domingo Paez-Batista. (Florida Politics, WUFT News)

• UF’s student body president wasn’t impeached yesterday after all. (The Alligator)


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Around the state today

• Archaeologists are continuing to find more graves in a forgotten segregation-era African-American cemetery now buried under Tampa apartments. This is a different location than the one we referenced yesterday. (Tampa Bay Times, WUSF)

• Miami has become known as one of the state’s — if not the country’s — more expensive places to live, so WLRN set out to hear from those “struggling to make ends meet, and the experiences of others enjoying prosperity.”

• The state says opioid overdoses are declining slightly this year. (Florida Politics)

• The University of Miami professor accused of money laundering made his first court appearance yesterday. (Miami Herald)

• The Florida Phoenix has an update on the deadly coral disease and its rapid spread over the past five years off the state’s southern coasts.

• The part of Jacksonville Landing where a mass shooting took place last August is no more. (WJCT)

Is it a case of cause and effect for Visit Florida’s budget and slipping tourism numbers, or are more people simply deciding not to visit the state?

President Donald Trump is now a registered Florida voter. (WTSP)


From NPR News

• Politics: Democrats Have Wrapped Their Public Case On Impeachment. What Comes Next?

• Politics: How The GOP Is Faring In The Impeachment Inquiry Hearings

• World: Relatives Of Mexicans Killed In El Paso Shooting Are Suing Walmart

• National: Judge Blocks Justice Department’s Plan To Resume Federal Executions

• National: Advocates Challenge Trump Administration Plan To Let States And Towns Block Refugees

• Health: After A Cancer Diagnosis, Brothers Share As Much Time As Possible, Even On Dates

• Health: They Bring Medical Care To The Homeless And Build Relationships To Save Lives

• Health: ‘It’s Going To Get Worse’: How U.S. Countertop Workers Started Getting Sick

• Science: Infecting Mosquitoes With Bacteria Could Have A Big Payoff

About Ethan Magoc

Ethan is a journalist at WUFT News. He's a Pennsylvania native who found a home reporting Florida's stories. Reach him by emailing emagoc@wuft.org or calling 352-294-1525.

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