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The Point, April 9, 2019: Push For Recreational Marijuana Dies In Florida House In 2019 Without A Hearing

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Alachua County has extended its campaign against sexual violence. The campaign, Start By Believing, covers 44 states and hopes to help both men and women who have been sexually assaulted. (WUFT News)

• The Newberry Fire Department is adding another unit and the cost is just shy of $1 million. The department wants to decrease the wait time of those who call upon emergency responders. (The Alligator)

• Florida lawmakers have temporarily postponed legislation that would allow teachers to train to carry concealed guns at work. The goal of the program is for a faster response if there were an active shooter. (WUFT News)

• The University of Florida expected to have a new $50 million College of Engineering building completed in August, but a design delay pushed the cost up by $20 million and completion into next year. (The Alligator)


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Around the state today

Newspapers were not delivered yesterday to residents subscribed to a variety of GateHouse-owned newspapers, including the Gainesville Sun, Florida Times-Union and St. Augustine Record. Those in Ocala and Lakeland were also affected. A virus affected the papers’ servers. (WJCT)

Recreational marijuana was shut down this year in the state House and did not receive a hearing. (Orlando Weekly)

• Members of Congress were denied entry to the Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Migrant Children by the Trump administration. One lingering question: Was that denial legal? (Florida Politics, Miami Herald)

• A bill that would have allowed guns in churches with schools on their property died yesterday in a Senate committee. This meeting was the committee’s last for 2019 legislative session. The bill will not get the checkmark it needs to move forward. (Florida Politics)

• A well-known lobbyist for the NRA in Florida filed a lawsuit saying she had been threatened and harassed; however, a federal judge says the claims were protected by the First Amendment. (News Service of Florida)

A $38 million expansion will be added to the Dalí museum in St. Petersburg. Officials are hoping to draw 900,000 more visitors after the project’s completion. (Tampa Bay Times)

• As temperatures rise, children and families aren’t the only one’s cooling off in the pool. A Palm Beach Gardens resident found an 8-foot alligator taking a swim in his backyard pool. (Miami Herald)


News from NPR

• National: Federal Judge Blocks Trump Administration Policy Of Sending Asylum-Seekers To Mexico

• National: Felicity Huffman And 12 Other Parents To Plead Guilty In College Cheating Scandal

• National: Facing Escalating Workplace Violence, Hospital Employees Have Had Enough

• World: After A Decade Of Netanyahu, Hopes Fade For A Palestinian State

• World: Vegan Protesters Block Downtown Melbourne In Coordinated Action Across Australia

• World: Fighting Grips Tripoli As Libya Faces New Violence Among Rivals

• Business: Government Watchdog Flips On Dollar Coin

• Science: ‘Losing Earth’ Explores How Oil Industry Played Politics With The Planet’s Fate

About Kylie Adkins

Kylie is a reporter for WUFT News who can be reached by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

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