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Four arrested for homicide involvement in Clay County

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Four people were arrested on Thursday in connection with the theft and transfer of the gun used in the killing of Clay County Detective David White in February 2012.

White was shot and killed while investigating a possible methamphetamine production at convicted felon Ted Tilley’s residence on Alligator Boulevard in Middleburg, according to a news release.

Another detective, Matthew Hanlin, was also shot in his upper left arm, but survived, according to the Gainesville Sun.

Investigators discovered the firearm used to kill White was stolen in Jacksonville in May 2011. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms found the weapon was stolen by Robert Apple II, 22, of Orange Park, and then passed through the hands of three people who, according to investigators, knew the weapon was stolen.

Police say three men knew the weapon was stolen: Christopher Henderson, 21, and Curtis “Ping” Dingler, 19, both of Middleburg, and Jack Lemond, 36, of Orange Park. They were all arrested.

Lemond ultimately provided the weapon to Tilley, who then used the weapon to fire at detectives White and Hanlin last year, according to a news release.

The four men were booked into Clay County Jail and charged with dealing stolen property.

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