WUFT News

Gainesville couple brings home quintuplets after two months in Shands neonatal intensive care unit

By on January 15th, 2013

The first quintuplets born at Shands Hospital for Children are going home after spending two months in the neonatal intensive care unit.

Kelley Dyal, father of the five newborns, was in shock when he saw five heart beats during one of his wife’s ultrasounds.

“It just (took my)  breath away,” Dyal said.

The couple arrived at the hospital six weeks prior to the delivery in order for Stacy, his wife, to receive care from the multidisciplinary team at Shands. Kelley and his wife are overjoyed to welcome their babies into the world, but he says he will never forget the anxious atmosphere in the delivery room.

Watching the quintuplets’ delivery was the hardest part for Kelley, but Stacy says having to stay in bed for weeks was almost unbearable.

Dr. Anthony Gregg, chief of maternal-fetal medicine at Shands, said the attention given by Shands neonatal and multidisciplinary staff was a crucial part in making sure the birth of the Dyal children went mostly free from complications.

The Dyals are concerned with having the funds to pay for the babies’ expenses. United Way of North Central Florida has set up a fund to help the Dyal family buy items like diapers and formula for the babies.

If you would like to make a donation to the fund, call 352-331-2800 or visit www.unitedway.ncfl.org.

Leila Milgrim wrote this story online. 


This entry was posted in Health and Science and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Health and Science

Dr. Ellen Zimmerman, 58, is a gastro neurologist at Shands Hospital at the University of Florida and a professor at the UF College of Medicine.  In her opinion, not the opinion of the university, medical marijuana has quite a few risk factors for patients with Crohn’s Disease, giving rise to her vote of “no” on the failed Amendment 2.

Crohn’s Disease Patient Still Looking For Answers After Amendment 2 Fails

Amendment 2 failed in Florida by a narrow margin, resulting in outrage from the bill’s supporters. A student who suffers from Crohn’s disease gives his perspective on the use of marijuana for medical purposes in the wake of continued debate.


The Alachua County Fire Rescue upgraded  the wireless routers in its ambulances. The ACFR received a grant of $41,200 from both UF Health Shands Hospital and North Florida Regional Medical Center to afford the update.

Alachua Fire Rescue Upgrades Ambulance Routers for Enhanced Patient Care

With help from area hospitals, Alachua County Fire Rescue has upgraded the wireless routers inside their ambulances, which transmit patient information to the hospital prior to their arrival.


CDC Creates Stricter Guidelines For Treatment Of Ebola Patients

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have created stricter guidelines for the treatment of Ebola patients. The new guidelines address training and hands-on experience, preventing skin exposure, and strict observation of putting on and taking off Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).


Hydrocodone has been moved to a stricter schedule II drug from a schedule III, making it more difficult to obtain for prescribed patients.

Hydrocodone Now More Difficult to Obtain for Prescribed Users

The Drug Enforcement Agency is tightening restrictions on oxycodone, making it more difficult for prescribed patients to obtain refills for their prescriptions.


Local Student Develops Epilepsy App, Wins $75,000

Amir Helmy’s science fair project idea has since developed into Seizario, an app that will allow epilepsy patients to monitor their seizures using the sensors from smartphones.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments