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Gainesville couple brings home quintuplets after two months in Shands neonatal intensive care unit

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The first quintuplets born at Shands Hospital for Children are going home after spending two months in the neonatal intensive care unit.

Kelley Dyal, father of the five newborns, was in shock when he saw five heart beats during one of his wife’s ultrasounds.

“It just (took my)  breath away,” Dyal said.

The couple arrived at the hospital six weeks prior to the delivery in order for Stacy, his wife, to receive care from the multidisciplinary team at Shands. Kelley and his wife are overjoyed to welcome their babies into the world, but he says he will never forget the anxious atmosphere in the delivery room.

Watching the quintuplets’ delivery was the hardest part for Kelley, but Stacy says having to stay in bed for weeks was almost unbearable.

Dr. Anthony Gregg, chief of maternal-fetal medicine at Shands, said the attention given by Shands neonatal and multidisciplinary staff was a crucial part in making sure the birth of the Dyal children went mostly free from complications.

The Dyals are concerned with having the funds to pay for the babies’ expenses. United Way of North Central Florida has set up a fund to help the Dyal family buy items like diapers and formula for the babies.

If you would like to make a donation to the fund, call 352-331-2800 or visit www.unitedway.ncfl.org.

Leila Milgrim wrote this story online. 

About Ethan Magoc

Ethan is a journalist at WUFT News. He's a Pennsylvania native who found a home reporting Florida's stories. Reach him by emailing emagoc@wuft.org or calling 352-294-1525.

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