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Gainesville Police roll out new apps, service for mobile devices

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The Gainesville Police Department announced two new apps and a text messaging service that allows mobile phone users to submit tips and receive updates and alerts from the GPD.

Mobile users can sign up for the text alerts on GPD’s website, here. Users can report crimes by sending “GPDFL” to “274637” (“Crimes”)

Smartphone users on the Android and iOS platforms can download an app called TipSoft, made by CrimeReports, which “allows agencies and members of the public to have a two-way dialog that is completely secure and anonymous,” according to a GPD release.

Police say that the service is designed for “non-urgent illegal activity” and users remain anonymous:

The tip service specifically allows text message providers to remain anonymous by encrypting the text messages, assigning them a unique ID, and routing them through secure servers, protecting the personal details of the information provider.

These new services join other public outreach efforts including the GPD’s Facebook and Twitter pages.

Video report by Casey Liening.

About Matt Sheehan

Matt can be reached by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

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