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The Point, June 13, 2019: How Florida Is Responding To The Hepatitis A Outbreak

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Today’s top stories

• Just before a three-year remembrance of the Pulse nightclub shooting victims began last night, a rainbow appeared in the mostly blue sky near the site. Here’s a recap of the gathering from WMFE, Orlando’s NPR affiliate.

• In a bit of derp on the solemn occasion, Gov. Ron DeSantis or someone on his staff forgot to include a mention of the LGBTQ community in a proclamation. Criticism followed, and he then issued a new one with the line “Florida will not tolerate hatred towards the LGBTQ and Hispanic communities.” (Politico)

• The governor yesterday also signed a bill called the Patient Savings Act to help lower the cost of healthcare, though it requires approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (WJCT)

• Florida has more reported cases of Hepatitis A in 2019 than the past five years combined. (WLRN)

• One of the University of Florida’s affiliated foundations is out of compliance in three key areas, according to the head of UF/IFAS. (Lakeland Ledger)

• The newly created Blue-Green Algae Task Force met for the first time yesterday to begin helping to solve the crisis that has plagued South Florida waters over the past few years. (Florida Times-Union)

• Reverse mortgages for seniors in Florida and nationwide look ever riskier, this Naples Daily News and USA Today investigation shows.

• Tony Joiner, a team captain on the 2007 Florida Gators football team, today is scheduled to appear for the first time in a Lee County courtroom for the second-degree murder charge against him. (Fort Myers News-Press)

• This is a neat effort to help save Florida’s native bees: Bo Sterk is placing bee hotels around St. Johns County. (St. Augustine Record)

• Tallahassee has had two destructive church fires in the past month, and the State Fire Marshal is investigating. (Tallahassee Democrat)

• If you’ve wanted to try surfing in Florida — “the perfect place for beginners” — this guide from TCPalm can get you started.

With a last name like “Way,” it seems inevitable that this man living in Gainesville would become Florida’s first “Trailwarrior.” (Gainesville Sun)

• There’s an honest and worthwhile discussion to read on r/GNV today about the city’s cost of living. “Rents are the cheapest in the state for most metro areas,” the top comment reads, “Yet on the affordability side of it, it is still unaffordable to most workers.”


Today’s sponsored message

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From NPR News

• National: As Polar Ice Cap Recedes, The U.S. Navy Looks North

• World: Mexico Says All Details Of Immigration Deal With The U.S. Have Been Released

• Health: Rural Health: Financial Insecurity Plagues Many Who Live With Disability

• Health: The Swap: Less Processed Meat, More Plant-Based Foods May Boost Longevity

• Politics: Trump: If Offered Dirt By Foreign Government On 2020 Rival, ‘I Think I’d Take It’

• Business: From Henry Ford To Elon Musk: The Past, Present And Future Of Cars

• Education: Former Stanford Sailing Coach Avoids Prison Time For College Admissions Scandal

About Ethan Magoc

Ethan is a journalist at WUFT News. He's a Pennsylvania native who found a home reporting Florida's stories. Reach him by emailing emagoc@wuft.org or calling 352-294-1525.

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