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FHP Curbs Truck Harassment, Hopes To Make Highways Safer for Truckers

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The Florida Highway Patrol is cracking down on aggressive drivers this week in a campaign to bring more respect and safety to larger trucks on the road.

Truck drivers making their way through the state today witnessed and even experienced driving harassment, or reckless driving that can endanger a large truck. One trucker was fortunate to survive an accident nearly caused by a reckless car.

Truck driver Melvin Milliner tapped his break after a car merged in front of him.  It was raining, and his truck fishtailed and eventually jackknifed.

Troopers said a combination of several moving violations, speed and swift lane changes in front of other vehicles can result in a heavy fine. The Ticketing Aggressive Cars and Trucks program targets drivers who commit these violations.

“We share the road. No matter what you’re driving, we need to remember to be courteous and patient with one another,” said highway patrol Public Affairs Officer Sgt. Tracy Hisler-Pace.

Driving harassment isn’t always a one-way street. Some truck drivers said they could be at fault for some aggressive driving.

“Sometimes we don’t signal, but we get away with it because we’re so much bigger,” said truck driver Skip Crenshaw.

Truck drivers say the best way to make drivers of smaller cars visible is to use signals and make eye contact with truck drivers. If you can see them in their mirrors, then they can see you.

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