Home / The Rundown / Alachua County Sheriff’s Office Will Now Take Your Biomass Noise Complaints

Alachua County Sheriff’s Office Will Now Take Your Biomass Noise Complaints

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Noise, smoke and dust invading your neighborhood may seem like an urgent problem, but when it’s the routine conditions of a licensed plant, officials say it’s really not a 911 emergency.

If people will keep their cool, a dedicated call center will now process those biomass complaints.

The Alachua County Sheriff’s Office has gotten some of those noise related complaints, according to spokesman Art Forgey.

“Over time, several studies were done on the amount of noise that is produced and it was determined that it wasn’t breaking any noise limit thresholds so therefore it wasn’t a police matter but rather a quality of life matter,” Forgey said.

Quality of life matters aren’t emergencies.

There are multiple local entities involved with the establishment of the new call center. That’s because they want to make sure that when people dial 911, it’s for the right reasons.

Alachua County, the cities of Gainesville and Alachua, along with local law enforcement and GRU have been meeting to address these quality of life complaints, hence the quality of life hotline.

The number is 352-338-2479.

“We just take the person’s information and whatever their concern is and then we just pass it on to the various people that we’re supposed to give it to,” said Theresa Becks, who runs the new biomass call center.

They’ve already gotten six calls after being in operation for about a day — four of those calls were noise complaints. The new call center takes complaints 24 hours a day, seven days a week and is being paid for by GRU.

Sean Bellafiore contributed reporting.

About Sean Bellafiore

Sean is a reporter for WUFT News who may be contacted by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news @wuft.org

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  • TheGrittyEdge

    “If people will keep their cool,….” WTH is THAT supposed to mean?? It has been obvious since day one with the BIO MESS that the City of Gainesville, GRU, and GREC could care less about the quality of life issues of those living in close proximity to this boondoggle, especially when those affected aren’t able to vote in Gainesville.