WUFT News

Demand For ‘Good Bacteria’ Expected To Continue Increasing

By on October 30th, 2013
DanActive is one of many foods products to use probiotics. Probiotics are bacterial supplements that help digestive issues.

mj ecker / Flickr

DanActive is one of many food products to use probiotics. Probiotics are bacterial supplements that help with digestive issues.

Chances are you’ve seen “good bacteria” on store shelves.

They’re known as probiotics and are part of the multi-billion-dollar industry of health supplements.

Probiotics are similar to the beneficial bacteria found naturally in the human gut, according to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. These bacteria reduce harmful organisms in the intestine and stimulate the body’s immune system.

The probiotic supplements are often marketed as helping to prevent and treat digestive problems.

“(People are) starting to understand that it can be a very inexpensive and an easy fix,” said Wesley Cooke, an assistant manager at Sunflower Health Foods.

Demand worldwide is expected to reach almost $45 billion by 2018, according to a report by Transparency Market Research.

The University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences has been conducting research on probiotics.

“The proven research benefits of probiotics are not as bona fide as we would want them to be,” said Tyler Culpepper, a postdoctoral associate at UF. ”There are lots of studies that show some conflicting things, but fortunately there are some things that are pretty well-represented and replicated.”

The proven benefits involve gastrointestinal health, and newer research is exploring possible benefits to immune health, weight maintenance and managing cholesterol, Culpepper said.

Probiotics, however, come in many strains and can affect people differently. Culpepper added that even the most reliable benefit of improving gastrointestinal symptoms may not work for everyone.

“Though it’s promising that probiotics are beneficial, we still need to lock in some of the mechanisms by which they work and try to find a way to tailor-make a probiotic cocktail for each individual person, so that they receive the maximum benefit,” Culpepper said.


This entry was posted in Health and Science and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Health and Science

Veterinarian Heather Case draws blood from a horse. Case is now legally able to
take controlled substances outside of clinics to administer care to patients thanks to the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act.

New Controlled Substance Law A Relief For Veterinarians

The recently passed Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act has been celebrated by veterinarians. The new law allows vets to legally bring controlled substances, such as anesthesia and euthanasia, with them when working outside their clinics.


Isaiah Attah, a subject in "Terra Blight," was 13 years old during the film and is now 18. Attah was metal scavenging for extra money to pay for school.

University of Florida Alumni Shed Light on Electronic Waste

Environmental documentary to showcase in Rome this October. Director and community members share their thoughts on the impact of old electronics.


Samsun Lampotang (left) and David Lizdas practice using the simulator to deliver a dose of anesthesia. They believe this euiptment can be used to help military doctors practice difficult procedures with limited resources.

UF Researchers Develop “Mixed-Reality” Training Technology for Military

Experts at UF develop simulators to help military doctors by providing opportunities to practice techniques. The Department of Defense granted the research team $1.7 million to develop five simulators over five years.


Robot and avatar in SecondLife

Ocala Scientist Tests How People Trust Technology

Ocala-based scientist plans to begin government-funded simulation in June. The simulation will examine the trust humans have in robots.


Grief counselors were sent to Keystone Heights Junior/Senior High School, at 900 Orchid Ave., in Keystone Heights. Clay County School District is undertaking measures to improve their suicide prevention and intervention methods.

Clay County Schools Reassessing Suicide Prevention Resources

Following three student suicides this year, Clay County School District is launching an outreach initiative to help students, parents and school personnel identify at-risk students and link them with resources.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments