Government Shutdown Affects Military Death Benefits

By on October 11th, 2013

The government may have hit the pause button when it shut down, but halfway across the world, our military is still fighting.

The shutdown has left families of fallen military without the death gratuity that is normally given out by the Pentagon.

Ed Van Buren, a board member of the Gainesville Fisher House Foundation, said the $100,000 gratuity can’t replace a loved one, but he believes it is necessary to continue to help the families.

“We just don’t want to lose anymore sons and daughters in the global war on terrorism,” he said. “But in spite of that, having great americans like the Fisher Foundation, the Gainesville Fisher House Foundation, makes up for the inaccuracies and the problems that may occur in our political system.”

Before the shutdown went into effect, the government agreed to pass a bill that would allow for the continued payment of the military; however, death benefits were not included in the bill, according to the Pentagon.

Since the government shut down, nearly 30 families have lost a loved one, for which the government has not provided the necessary benefits.

Ben Van Buren, a Purple Heart Recipient, said that the death benefits being cut is a painful repercussion from the government shut down.

“We never did it for the money, and finding out that some of our benefits do get cut it kinda hurts our feelings a little bit, but then we still have to keep fighting no matter what,” he said. “Finding that specifically the death benefits for our families are gone that does put a little thorn in our side.”

This entry was posted in National and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

More Stories in National

Gabriela Moncada walks with her boyfriend Michael as they head to dinner. "It’s crazy how some people think it’s a red flag when women in their late twenties and thirties don’t have a ring on their finger," she said.

Students React To Study Explaining The Decrease Of Marriages

The Brookings Institution has found that there is a shortage of marriageable men in the United States. The research found that the shortage is one of several reasons why marriage rates have declined over the past few decades.

Florida Ranks Highly in Assimilating Hispanics

Florida was named the sixth-best state in the country when it comes to assimilating Hispanics into American society. The rankings were based on the state’s ability to assimilate Hispanics into American cultural, educational and economic systems.

Tanisha Bennett, Lauren Smith and other members of Being A Girl attended the Women's Student Assembly on August 31, 2015. "Our mission is to educate and empower women so we can overcome barriers in all categories of society, whether it is professional or personal," Smith said.

“Dear Fat People” video sparks debate, increased discussion of obesity in America

Tanisha Bennett, founder of Being a Girl, discusses the Dear Fat People video. The UF-based group is dedicated to empowering girls and talks about international video’s effect on body image, fitness and health.

Steven Sotloff’s Parents Open Up As 1-Year Anniversary Nears

One year has passed since journalist Steven Sotloff’s beheading. Sotloff’s parents have a memorial foundation, which will give journalism students scholarships.

Boy Scout Flag Saluteat Gerald R. Ford MuseumBoy Scout Flag Salute at Gerald R. Ford Museum.

Boy Scouts Open Doors For Gay Leadership

Boy Scouts of America have lifted the ban on gay leadership, creating opportunities for increased membership and unit formation.

Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments