WUFT News

Alachua County recognized for highest 2011 recycling rate in the state

By on April 2nd, 2013

Alachua County had the highest recycling rate in the state in 2011 for the second straight year, a recent report says.

According to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the county’s recycling rate was about 50 percent in 2011. The rate is defined as the quantity of solid waste that is recycled instead of being stored at a landfill.

Alachua County Waste Alternatives Manager Partick Irby said much of the county’s success is due to the mandatory commercial recycling ordinance implemented in 2001. The ordinance requires all commercial generators to separate designated recycling materials and make them available for recycling.

“With the two larger entities within the county having that ordinance, that helps out,” Irby said. “We also have a very robust curbside recycling program.”

Residents participating in the program place bottles and cans in blue bins and paper and cardboard in orange bins. Materials picked up from the curb are then brought to SP Fiber Technologies and sorted into containers and fibers.

Alachua County collected 410,380 tons of municipal solid waste and recycled 205,070 tons, according to the Solid Waste Management in Florida 2011 Annual Report. The state collected 26,486,286 tons of municipal solid waster and recycled just 30 percent.

The Florida Legislature hopes to attain a 75 percent statewide recycling rate by 2020. The Department of Environmental Protection submitted a comprehensive program plan in 2010 to achieve this goal.

According to the plan, recycling will be enhanced “in an economically responsible way through heightened public awareness, state leadership, development and expansion of recycling markets, and more investments throughout the local government and commercial sectors.”

“We are still a long way away from our goal,” Irby said, “so every little bit counts.”

Alachua County’s recycling rate is five percentage points higher than neighboring Marion County.  The 2012 numbers will be revealed in the next couple of months.


This entry was posted in Environment and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Environment

Swallowtail_one

Food Safety Guidelines Could Alter Sustainable Farm

A new Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) by the FDA may pose a challenge to farmers who are using an alternative fertilizer.


Onna Maya Meyer, of Alachua, hoops at the 
Swallowtail Farm Country Fair Saturday evening.

GALLERY: Swallowtail Farm Hosts County Fair

Swallowtail Farm held its 5th annual country fair at its farm just north of Alachua on Saturday.


The FWC restocked the lake’s depleted largemouth bass population with 100,000 bass fingerlings, but it’ll take at least a year or two before the fish mature and the depleted population is
restored.

Orange Lake Levels Rising for First Time in More Than a Decade

After years of drought, this year’s rainfall has restored Orange Lake’s water levels.


Little River Springs County Park, located 3.5 miles north of Branford, Fla., is one of the springs protection and restoration projects recently approved by the Suwannee River Management District Governing Board. The refurbishments will repair the eroding shoreline damaged by river floods over the years.

Little River Springs County Park Will Receive More Than $100,000 In Restorations

The Suwannee River Water Management District has formed a partnership with the county for large repairs to take place in Little River Springs County Park near Branford. After river flooding, the park needs refurbishments to bank failures and damage to the spring bed.


A Florida gopher tortoise in its natural habitat. A new app by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will receive geographic locations of the threatened species through user-generated images.

Florida Aims to Protect Gopher Tortoises with App

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission developed an app that will help scientists gather data on the locations of gopher tortoises. The app could help better track the threatened species.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments