WUFT News

Prescribed burn at Paynes Prairie

By on February 22nd, 2013

On Friday, Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park working in cooperation with the Florida Forest Service underwent a prescribed burn on the prairie basin ignited by helicopter.

“There’s actually an apparatus on the helicopter that shoots out essentially a ping-pong shaped sphere,” said Amber Roux, Paynes Prairie State Park services specialist.

“There’s a time delay of about 15 seconds or so before that sphere ignites,” she said. “So it’s already on the ground hopefully by the time that it ignites and it lights a fire on the ground.”

Firefighter router craft pilot Kevin Fender said using the helicopter is more efficient than burning by hand.

“With this machine we’ll burn these 800-acres in probably about 30 minutes,” he said. They’ll be done in about three or four hours, as soon as everything burns out.”

Roux said the helicopter is also a safer method.

“There are certain areas that are hard to get to, areas at the prairie basin are pretty wet,” she said. “Just some of the environmental conditions out there are hard for us to get that many people out in a quick period of time.”

The goals of the burn are reducing some hardwood trees that have moved in on the basin and promoting the growth of grasses. As well as mitigating potential wildfires.

Roux said if there is any chance of it reaching a highway the fire would impact State Road 20, although it’s not expected to.

“It’s our plan to not have any smoke on the roads,” she said.

 Sarah Brand wrote this story online. 


This entry was posted in Environment and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Environment

burmesefeaturedimage

Workshop Sparks Debate on Dangers of Burmese Pythons

Florida wildlife officials have boosted their efforts against Burmese pythons by inviting the public to join the fight, but some researchers and breeders disagree on the severity of the python problem.


Small lopsided fruit from greening-infected citrus tree. Photo courtesy of UF/IFAS.

New Funds Help UF/IFAS Fight Citrus Greening In Central Florida

University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences was awarded about $13.4 million to help fund four research projects aimed at finding a solution to citrus greening.


nonnativefishphoto1

FWC Hosts First Statewide Nonnative Fish Catch

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission hosts the first statewide nonnative fish catch. The contest was created to raise awareness and help reduce the growing population of invasive fish species in Florida’s waters.


Farmer Cody Galligan, 35, hangs his tools on the side of the building at Siembra Farm.

Siembra Farm Encourages Sustainability Through Local Community Food System

Local farm practices sustainable farming techniques through community supported agriculture. The University of Florida Office of Sustainability has been working with the farm to provide sustainable food options to the community.


Hydroponic Farm Finds A Cleaner, More Natural Way To Grow Crops

A farm that uses Blue Grotto Spring water is finding a cleaner and more natural way to grow produce through hydroponic farming, a method that grows plants without soil.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments