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Five little-known facts about Presidents Day


Presidents Day honors past presidents of the U.S. each year on the third Monday in February.

Today is not just another Monday off. The date has a wide range of history and facts that are relatively unknown to the average American.

The small Florida town of Eustis, for example, has a tradition of hosting its annual “GeorgeFest” celebration, which started in 1902.

Here are some more fun facts about Presidents Day to think about while lounging with a book, catching up on work or sleeping through today:

1. Presidents Day was created as part of 1971’s Uniform Monday Holiday Act,  which aimed to create more three-day weekends for U.S. workers, according to the History Channel.

2. Several Canadian provinces have enacted official holidays on the same weekend as Presidents Day, according to American Intercontinental University. Family Day and Islander Day are some of these holidays.

3. Presidents Day is not recognized under that title to the federal government. It is called just Washington’s Birthday. Though people often celebrate both George Washington and Abraham Lincoln’s birthday on the day, there is no official recognition of the date having anything to do with Lincoln, according to the History Channel.

4. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are more than 90 places, minor civil divisions and counties in the U.S. named after George Washington.

5. According to the Huffington Post, George Washington’s legendary wooden teeth weren’t actually wooden. Rather, the teeth were made of gold, ivory, lead and animal teeth.

About Kelsey Meany

Kelsey is a reporter who can be contacted by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

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