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Roads to be stuffed with Thanksgiving traffic

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Tummies will be full of turkey dinner come Thursday, but not before the roads are full of cars.

According to AAA’s projections, 90 percent of people traveling during Thanksgiving will be driving. Spokesperson Jessica Brady said the key to avoiding the heaviest delays and still making it on time for Thanksgiving dinner is departure time.

“Wednesday is looking to be the busiest travel day, so if you can leave Tuesday afternoon after work or even Thursday morning if that will allow you to get to dinner on time, you will save yourself a little bit of traffic than if you were to leave the day before Thanksgiving,” she said.

AAA also said gas prices are expected to continue dropping through the holiday. The current national average for the price of gas is $3.44. Last year, the average was at $3.32. Brady said the reason for the decline in price and why AAA is predicting prices to continue dropping is an issue of supply and demand.

“Not a lot of people have a need right now to get to and from work,” she said. “We’re not seeing a high usage of fuel.”

AAA is also predicting the price of airfares to drop slightly this year as compared to last year. Brady said although flying will likely be more expensive than driving, fewer people are choosing to fly this year, so it is possible delays at airports will not be as bad as in previous years.

The auto club expects a 10-percent increase for those traveling via bus or train.

“It’s probably a more affordable means of travel for many people, and it also takes away the hassle of having to drive if that was your other option.”

Brady’s advice for drivers: stay safe by making sure you’re not distracted and have patience in dealing with congestions and delays.

Emily Miller edited this story online.

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