Alachua County Library District To Expand Browsing Hours

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On Monday, Nov. 2, the Alachua County Library District will expand browsing hours to each of its 12 locations.

Expanded browsing hours launched by the Library District on Monday will begin at a limited capacity as follows:

  • Headquarters Library and Millhopper, Tower Road, and Alachua branches: Monday, Friday, and Saturday 2-5 p.m.; Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 2-7 p.m.
  • Cone Park, Hawthorne, High Springs, Library Partnership, and Newberry branches:
    Monday-Saturday 2-5 p.m.
  • Archer, Micanopy, and Waldo branches: Tuesday-Saturday 2-5 p.m.
  • Patrons are asked to reserve the 2-3 p.m. browsing hour for high-risk community
    members

Masks and social distancing are required at all times inside the building. Additionally, a brief health screening including a touchless temperature check is required prior to entering the building.

Available services during these browsing hours include:

  • Browsing
  • Checking out items, picking up holds, applying for a new library card, and renewing a library card
  • Computer sessions by appointment or walk-up, based on availability
  • Copier and scanner use
  • Reference services

Services that will not be available during browsing hours include:

  • Seating
  • Meetings, study rooms, and Quiet Reading rooms
  • One-on-one computer assistance
  • Payments
  • Inside returns (all returns must be made using the exterior book drops)
Outside service will continue at all locations from 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Patrons can walk up to pick up materials, renew library cards, and register for new cards. Curbside service will be offered at Headquarters Library only 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Saturday for patrons who prefer to stay in their vehicles.

About Jason Myers

Jason is a reporter for WUFT News who can be reached by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

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