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Miami Celebrates After Fidel Castro’s Death

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The streets of Miami turned into crowds of celebration after Fidel Castro’s death was announced Friday night.

Street Calle Ocho was the host of this celebration for many Cubans residing in Miami for most of their lives. Cubans and Cuban-americans all gathered to rejoice. Many brought with them their cuban pride with flags, paintings and signs.

Castro was revolutionary leader who later served as prime minister and president of Cuba until 2006. He died at 90 years-old.

The joy and relief that is spreading around Miami is a heavy contrast to the mourning of Castro in Cuba.

WUFT News reporter Grace King captured photos of the celebration.

The Cuban community of Miami celebrates in the streets following the death of Fidel Castro (Grace King/WUFT News)
The Cuban community of Miami celebrates in the streets following the death of Fidel Castro (Grace King/WUFT News)

 

A guy throws up his hand as he marches down Calle Ocho with the giant Cuban Flag. (Grace King/ WUFT News)
A guy throws up his hand as he marches down Calle Ocho with the giant Cuban Flag. (Grace King/ WUFT News)

 

Miguel Inclan throws up his fist while holding onto the Cuban Flag with his other hand. He left Cuba in 1980. (Grace King/ WUFT News)
Miguel Inclan throws up his fist while holding onto the Cuban Flag with his other hand. He left Cuba in 1980. (Grace King/ WUFT News)

 

Cuban-American Carmen Valdes walks up and down Calle Ocho passionately chanting "We believe in Trump." She's thankful he won the presidency because he "hides secrets from no one." (Grace King/ WUFT News)
Cuban-American Carmen Valdes walks up and down Calle Ocho passionately chanting “We believe in Trump.” She’s thankful he won the presidency because he “hides secrets from no one.” (Grace King/ WUFT News)

 

Alfredo Ballester walks around with a mannequin wearing a shirt with "ABECEDARIO" and "12738" written on it. "ABECEDARIO" represents the book he wrote about his time in prison called "Memorias de Abecedario" and "12738" was his number while in the Cuban Morro Prison. (Grace King/ WUFT News)
Alfredo Ballester walks around with a mannequin wearing a shirt with “ABECEDARIO” and “12738” written on it. “ABECEDARIO” represents the book he wrote about his time in prison called “Memorias de Abecedario” and “12738” was his number while in the Cuban Morro Prison. (Grace King/ WUFT News)

 

Lisette Sauleda bangs a pot outside Versaille Restaurant in Little Havana with her kids. Sauleda escaped Cuba at age 13 by boarding a plane to Madrid, meeting up with a Spanish priest, and living at a Catholic School run by nuns. (Grace King/ WUFT News)
Lisette Sauleda bangs a pot outside Versaille Restaurant in Little Havana with her kids. Sauleda escaped Cuba at age 13 by boarding a plane to Madrid, meeting up with a Spanish priest, and living at a Catholic School run by nuns. (Grace King/ WUFT News)
Halan Lopez holds up a painting representing the freedom of Cuba. He described himself as the “Statue of Liberty” for Cuba and said he was making a “small sacrifice for the freedom of Cuba.” (Grace King/ WUFT News)
Halan Lopez holds up a painting representing the freedom of Cuba. He described himself as the “Statue of Liberty” for Cuba and said he was making a “small sacrifice for the freedom of Cuba.” (Grace King/ WUFT News)
A man waves a Cuban flag with the word "LIBRE," or "FREE" in English, on it. He was one of about 200 people who gathered on Calle Ocho Sunday night. (Grace King/ WUFT News)
A man waves a Cuban flag with the word “LIBRE,” or “FREE” in English, on it. He was one of about 200 people who gathered on Calle Ocho Sunday night. (Grace King/ WUFT News)

 

 

Tony Mirar was only 17 days old when he left Cuba. His dad's cousin was executed in the Bay of Pigs. (Grace King/ WUFT News)
Tony Mirar was only 17 days old when he left Cuba. His dad’s cousin was executed in the Bay of Pigs. (Grace King/ WUFT News)
From left to right: Leslie Gonshak, Robert Gonshak, and Lisette Sauleda pose for a picture outside Versaille Restaurant in Little Havana. Sauleda escaped Cuba at age 13 by boarding a plane to Madrid, meeting up with a Spanish priest, and living at a Catholic School run by nuns. (Grace King/ WUFT News)
From left to right: Leslie Gonshak, Robert Gonshak, and Lisette Sauleda pose for a picture outside Versaille Restaurant in Little Havana. Sauleda escaped Cuba at age 13 by boarding a plane to Madrid, meeting up with a Spanish priest, and living at a Catholic School run by nuns. (Grace King/ WUFT News)
Nestor Ramos holds up a sign reading "FIDÉL LLEVATE RAÚL AL INFIERNO" or "FIDEL TAKE YOUR BROTHER TO HELL" on Calle Ocho. Ramos came to the United States from Cuba in 1958. (Grace King/ WUFT News)
Nestor Ramos holds up a sign reading “FIDÉL LLEVATE RAÚL AL INFIERNO” or “FIDEL TAKE YOUR BROTHER TO HELL” on Calle Ocho. Ramos came to the United States from Cuba in 1958. (Grace King/ WUFT News)

About Jocelyn Flores

Jocelyn is a reporter for WUFT News. She can be reached at news@wuft.org or 352-392-6397.

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