WUFT News

Citrus County Teacher Recognized for Professional Program

By on April 17th, 2014
E.H. Lindsey works with a student using Autodesk software.

Alexandra Parish / WUFT News

E.H. Lindsey works with a student using Autodesk software.

E.H. Lindsey is one of two people in the U.S. to hold all three professional certifications offered by the American Design Drafting Association.

When he learned there was only one person who had all three – architectural, mechanical and civil drafting – Lindsey accepted the challenge to become the second person.

For the last 12 years he has been the instructor at the Citrus High School Drafting Academy at in Inverness, Fla. As a teacher he has not lost his drive, and it carries over into the classroom.

A simple and succinct motto is posted on the ceiling of the drafting lab: Victory starts here.

Since the drafting program became certified in 2008, 314 students have received certificates. An additional 29 students plan to take tests by the end of the school year.

“If I’m going to push them to work hard, I have to push myself hard,” Lindsey said.

Last month the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners recognized his efforts and the program’s success by officially declaring March 25 “Eugene Lindsey Day.”

Lindsey said he uses his personal experiences and challenges he has faced to encourage students to take tests offered to high school students by the ADDA. These include an architectural or mechanical drafting apprenticeship and professional certification.

After the intro to drafting course, or drafting 1, students are required to receive an apprenticeship certification if they want to take advanced classes, but Lindsey challenges students to go for their professional certifications too.

“I create an atmosphere of ‘Everybody else is getting certified, why aren’t you?’” Lindsey said.

Citrus High has graduated the most students with certifications in Florida and is currently second in the nation out of 60 schools, including high schools and colleges, according to Pennie King, programs manager for the ADDA.

Tyler Cernich, a senior drafting student, recently became one of 88 people in the U.S. to hold both architectural and mechanical professional certifications. He said this will be beneficial for his future at the University of Florida, where he plans to study civil or mechanical engineering.

Brandon Everett, a junior drafting student, is going for his professional mechanical certification, and joined the program because of the positive words he heard from his brother, a former drafting student, about Lindsey.

“It’s more than just drafting here,” Everett said. “He teaches you more about life and teaches students how to go for their goals.”

 

 

 

 


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