The Point, April 27, 2022: Governor schedules Florida’s special session to deal with property insurance rates

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The stories near you

• WUFT News: Newberry residents respond to a collection center coming to the city. “Newberry Mayor Jordan Marlowe said a new recycling center would decrease the time and gas it takes local residents to drive to the next closest center: about a half hour away.”

• Mainstreet Daily News: Newberry moves ahead on $4M-$6M city hall building. “Mayor Jordan Marlowe said the city is growing by 300 to 500 a year, meaning approximately 3-5 new staff members if the city wants to keep its level of service. The commission hopes to construct a complex with plenty of room to expand and fund future additions down the line.”

• Gainesville Sun ($): Gainesville considers creating ombudsman office to address residents’ complaints. “A proposal to create a new department within the city of Gainesville that would act as an ‘independent oversight agency’ for residents and city employees to air their concerns about city government is being considered.”

• CBS4: ACPS launches new internet connectivity survey. “ACPS Public Information Officer Jackie Johnson said the goal is to ensure students have access to devices and internet connection at home so they can work on their homework.”

• WUFT News: UF Health Shands puts up pinwheels for child abuse prevention. “These pinwheels are a part of Pinwheels for Prevention. This national campaign was designed by Prevent Child Abuse America in 2008 to increase awareness of child abuse prevention efforts.”

• WCJB: Gainesville pastor calls on community to renovate a historic Black church. “He’s been partnering with the city of Gainesville, University of Florida architecture students and UF’s historic preservation program. The church is a monument in the Pleasant Street neighborhood as it once served as a safe haven for the Black community.”


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Around the state

• WFSU: Florida lawmakers to tackle rising home insurance costs in May. “This year’s second special lawmaking session is scheduled to begin on May 23 and could last through May 27. That’s days before the Atlantic hurricane season begins on June 1.”

• New York Times ($): Parents File Lawsuit Over Son’s Fatal Fall From Amusement Ride. “Tyre Sampson, 14, died after falling from the 430-foot-tall Free Fall ride at an amusement park in Orlando, Fla., last month. The lawsuit says a seatbelt could have saved his life.”

• NPR News: Florida man asks schools to ban Bible following the state’s efforts to remove books. “His petitions cited a bill signed into law last month by Gov. Ron DeSantis, which lets parents object to educational materials. That bill came about after some parents complained about sexually explicit books being taught in Florida schools.”

• Lakeland Ledger ($): Florida’s book bans: Which titles are being pulled from school media centers? “Approved on March 25 by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, HB 1467 gives parents and members of the public increased access to the process of selecting and removing school library books and instructional materials.”

• News Service of Florida: State of Florida and voter groups battle over elections ruling. “After a federal judge blocked parts of a 2021 elections law that he said discriminated against Black voters, the state and opponents of the law are battling about whether the ruling should be put on hold while an appeals court considers the case.”

• WFSU: Diaz says he wants to change the tone around what it means to be a teacher amid statewide shortages. “Diaz was recently recommended by Gov. Ron DeSantis to become state education commissioner. He’ll replace Richard Corcoran, who steps down at the end of this month. Diaz says while he’s no longer in the classroom, the experiences stick with him.”


From NPR News

• Health: Most Americans have been infected with the COVID-19 virus, the CDC reports

• Health: Vice President Harris has tested positive for COVID-19

• Health: Pfizer asks FDA to authorize booster shots for kids ages 5 through 11

• Health: Older adults shouldn’t start a routine of daily aspirin, task force says

• World: Vaccine-derived polio is on the rise. A new vaccine aims to stop the spread

• National: Biden takes his first actions on clemency with 3 pardons and 75 commutations

• Business: Shares continue to slump as fears about the economy and earnings grip Wall Street

• World: Poland and Bulgaria say Russia is suspending their natural gas supplies

• World: How does Ukraine keep intercepting Russian military communications?

About today’s curator

I’m Melissa Feito, a journalist at WUFT. Originally from Miami, I got my start in public radio covering religion stories like the spiritual roots of Afro-Brazilian music and modern communities of pagans. I’m a graduate student getting my master’s degree in mass communication and am part of a team searching for local and state news each week that’s important to you. Please send feedback about today’s edition of The Point or ideas for stories we may have missed to mfeito2@ufl.edu.

About WUFT News

Contact WUFT News by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news @wuft.org

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