The Point, April 24, 2020: Floridians Recently Unemployed To Get Second Chance At Relief Benefits

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The top stories near you

• WUFT News: ‘I’m Definitely More Stressed’: Internet Issues Create Hardship For People Working, Learning From Home. “Sandra Starling was stunned to see a boy sitting with a laptop on a sidewalk outside a fast-food restaurant along U.S. Route 301 in Starke. She didn’t catch his name or age, but shared his story in a recent Facebook post that’s been shared more than 18,500 times.”

• From the WUFT News Instagram: Millhopper Montessori pre-K student Cooper Barrett and his family had planned a move to northern California before the coronavirus pandemic happened. But he wasn’t ready to leave without saying proper goodbyes, so his teacher organized a parade of cars to drive by Cooper’s house the day before the family left. Visit our Instagram or Facebook for photo and video coverage.

• Suwannee Democrat: Suwannee County requesting state help at rehab facility. “County Administrator Randy Harris said the outbreak at the facility has been a cause of concern for many county residents and that he didn’t make the request lightly in asking DeSantis’ office for help.”

• WUFT News: From The Front Lines Podcast. “Maria Eunice, director of Alachua County Public Schools Food and Nutritional Services, discusses how much longer the district can provide free meals, and what she and her colleagues are doing to help farmers and families in Alachua County.”

• Gainesville Sun ($): Citra nurse describes NYC’s ‘open war’ against COVID. “Anelsa Blunt, a 19-year nurse from Citra, headed to New York City to work in Manhattan hospitals she describes as a ‘war zone.'”

• Citrus County Chronicle: Coronavirus crisis inspires new avenues for delivering grief support. “Even though most of the traditional face-to-face support groups are not taking place at this moment when participants need that support more than ever, technology is providing alternative pathways for professionals to continue delivering hope, understanding and guidance to grieving individuals as well as to support group members.”

• Gainesville Sun ($): Med students get 6 feet closer. “We should all know by now to stay at least 6 feet away from other people if we want to be socially distant during the coronavirus pandemic. So forget giving hospital workers, nurses, doctors and others on the front line a handshake of thanks or a hug of comfort. But a corps of University of Florida medical students have created a virtual way to give thanks.”

• WUFT News: Crowds Pack U-Pick Blueberry Farms, Raise Safety Concerns. “In Williston, the Red, White and Blues Farm was visited by as many as 1,000 people during this past weekend, with a line at the weigh station that was about 100 yards long, according to Terry Robinson, one of the farm’s owners.”


Around the state today

• Florida Politics: State agrees to some ‘retroactive eligibility’ for unemployment benefits. “The many Floridians who lost their jobs in recent weeks, then struggled with the unemployment claims process, will get a lifeline. DMS Secretary Jonathan Satter said the state ‘..will be affecting a retroactive period to March 9th so it would be the day of their job loss or March 9th’ that jobless Floridians begin receiving back benefits, according to Action News Jax.”

• Pensacola News Journal: Santa Rosa County Commission votes to re-open Navarre Beach for five hours each day. “Santa Rosa County will re-open Navarre Beach in a series of phases beginning May 1, becoming the latest Panhandle county to initiate a gradual re-opening of local beaches as health officials say the curve of COVID-19 cases is beginning to flatten.”

• WMFE: Immigration into the United States Will Be Suspended Tonight: Here’s How it Could Affect Central Florida Families. “ACLU lawyer Karen Iezzi says older children and other family members of American citizens won’t be able to apply for green cards under the order that takes effect at midnight.”

• Orlando Weekly: Former Orlando congresswoman released from prison, as coronavirus cases rise in Florida. “Former Orlando congresswoman Corrine Brown was released from prison Wednesday, less than halfway through her five-year sentence for fraud, federal corruption, conspiracy and tax evasion. Her attorney successfully argued that she is especially vulnerable to coronavirus.”

• WLRN: Miami-Dade Schools See Lower Virtual Attendance In Low-Income, Immigrant Communities. “Despite the best efforts of school districts, virtual learning exacerbates the existing inequities in education. That’s true in Miami-Dade County, where early data show the schools with the lowest attendance rates serve big populations of students who are living in poverty or still learning English.”

• Palm Beach Post: Publix pledges to help farmers by buying excess produce, donating it to food banks. “Publix announced this week that it will purchase fresh produce and milk to help farmers who have been hurt by the coronavirus pandemic. The supermarket chain will donate these products to Feeding America member food banks operating in the communities they serve.”

• Florida Politics: Gov. DeSantis confirms Florida will host charity golf match between PGA, NFL icons. “Gov. Ron DeSantis says Florida will host a charity golf match featuring PGA and NFL superstars to help benefit COVID-19 relief efforts. That charity match will feature Tiger Woods and Peyton Manning facing off against Phil Mickelson and Tom Brady.”

•WTSP: Tom Brady walks into stranger’s house days after trespassing in Tampa park. “How would you react if you were sitting in your kitchen and suddenly you look up to see Tom Brady in your house carrying duffel bags?”


From NPR News

• National: Congress Passes Latest Economic Relief Package to Confront Coronavirus

• World: EU Leaders Fail To Agree On Coronavirus Economic Recovery Program

• Health: U.S. Hospitals Hit By Financial ‘Triple Whammy’ During Coronavirus Pandemic

• Politics: Georgia Gov. Disregards Trump Criticism, Moves Ahead With Plans To Reopen Businesses

• National: Testing Capacity Will Determine Abilities Of States To Reopen

• Business: A Trombonist Wonders When An Audience Will Gather To Hear Music

• Health: He Keeps Driving For Lyft ‘Because People Need Us’

• Art & Design: N.Y.’s Met Museum Projects $150 Million Shortfall, Lays Off 81 Employees

About Kristen Altus

Kristen is a web editor and reporter for WUFT News. She can be reached by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing kaltus@ufl.edu. Follow her on social media @kristenaltus.

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