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The Point, Oct. 10, 2019: The Economic Class That Will Most Feel The Effects Of Sea Level Rise

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The top stories near you

• The assistant principal at Lake Forest Elementary School in Gainesville has had to perform the job duties of two people after the principal’s mandated removal earlier this year. It’s one of the effects of a state law designed to help struggling schools. (WUFT News)

• A sentence that has remained stubbornly true for more than two years appears today in the Gainesville Sun: “The future of Camp McConnell is once again open to any number of possibilities.”

• The sale of hundreds of thoroughbred horses in Ocala again brought in millions of dollars at this year’s auction. (Ocala Star-Banner)

• The owner of McIntosh Fish Camp has a major problem with the property. A leaky septic system drains right into Orange Lake. (WUFT News)

• The 2015 state bear hunt captured plenty of public attention in our area and statewide; another could be coming in the years ahead. (WUFT News, WMFE)


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Around the state today

• Politico reports on the mental health consequences at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and other schools that have recently had mass shootings take place.

• The man convicted of manslaughter for shooting another over a parking space in Clearwater will face his sentencing today. (AP)

• Two related climate change stories today: A new study suggests the poor are most likely to face the consequences of sea level rise in Florida and elsewhere, while a University of Miami graduate student co-authored a study about who benefits from the buyouts of flood-prone homes. (WLRN, NPR News)

• The Courageous 12 are a little-known part of the effort to end segregation in Florida and are getting slightly more recognition in St. Petersburg. (Bay News 9)

The arrival of electric scooters in St. Augustine Beach is still on hold. (WJCT)

WUSF examines whether trips to freestanding emergency rooms are worthwhile.

A vote on whether to fire the infamous Palm Beach County principal — he of the controversial Holocaust history comments — keeps getting delayed. (Palm Beach Post)

• Did you know there’s a Lakeland company in charge of deciding what logos will be featured on highway signs across the state? (TCPalm)


From NPR News

• Health: How Vaping Nicotine Can Affect A Teenage Brain

• Health: Zika: Researchers Are Learning More About The Long-Term Consequences For Children

• Health: Changing Your Diet Can Help Tamp Down Depression, Boost Mood

• Education: School Districts Sue Juul, Saying Student Vaping Drains Resources

• World: 2 People Killed In Shooting In Eastern Germany In Attack Outside Synagogue

• World: Thousands Of Women Will At Last Be Allowed To Attend A Soccer Match In Iran

• Politics: Adam Schiff, The Surprising Face Of The Impeachment Inquiry Of President Trump

• Science: After A Life Of Painful Sickle Cell Disease, A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help

• Books: Matt Lauer Accused Of Rape In New Book; Former NBC Star Denies ‘False Stories’

About Ethan Magoc

Ethan is a journalist at WUFT News. He's a Pennsylvania native who found a home reporting Florida's stories. Reach him by emailing emagoc@wuft.org or calling 352-294-1525.

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