Home / The Point / The Point, Sept. 19, 2019: A Decade After Its Enactment, Alachua County Is Enforcing The Airboat Curfew Ordinance

The Point, Sept. 19, 2019: A Decade After Its Enactment, Alachua County Is Enforcing The Airboat Curfew Ordinance

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• In the 10-year history of Alachua County’s controversial airboat curfew ordinance, a violator wasn’t handed a ticket until last month. An additional $20,000 was allocated in this year’s county budget to ramp up enforcement. (WUFT News)

• The City of Ocala joined in the federal opioid litigation this month just in time to be part of an expected settlement. (Ocala Star-Banner)

• Gainesville city commissioners have formed a race and equity subcommittee to explore ways for city government to begin improving upon its complicated racial history. (WUFT News)

• Imagine showing up as a parent with your child on the first day of school. The classroom lights are off, and it turns out no teacher has been assigned to your student’s class. That’s what one Gainesville parent faced last month amid a teacher shortage in Alachua County schools. (WUFT News)

• Gainesville City Commissioner Gigi Simmons is happy with the social, environmental and economic progress made in her eastside district during the first year she’s held office. (WUFT News)

A southbound lane on Interstate 75 in Columbia County is closed today as repairs continue following Tuesday’s fatal crash. (WCJB)

• Gainesville police provided the Gainesville Sun with some of the details emerging from the department’s helicopter crash at the airport in June.

• The husband and father of a woman and her four children found dead in Georgia has been brought back to Marion County from Georgia to face homicide charges. (Ocala Star-Banner)

“We can’t fix the genetic disorder she has, but the longer she lives, the better her chances are.” That’s the conclusion of a UF Health Shands doctor who has helped a couple navigate the first year of their child’s rare Peroxisomal Biogenesis Disorder diagnosis. (Gainesville Sun)


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Around the state today

Have active shooter drills in Florida schools already gone too far in the year and a half since the Parkland shooting? Law enforcement and lawmakers are considering new recommendations. (Florida Phoenix)

438 warnings, 542 tickets: Those are the numbers from the initial rollout of the state’s texting and driving ban. It begins in earnest in January. (GateHouse)

• The bizarre case of an American Airlines mechanic accused of sabotage at Miami International Airport took a turn yesterday in federal court. (Miami Herald)

• Probably not surprising, but Florida metro areas from Fort Myers to Jacksonville dominate a new report on the most dangerous walking areas nationwide. (Florida Today)

Are Florida high school athletes well protected against health hazards? A state House committee heard about the various problem areas still to be addressed. (Florida Politics)

• The suspect in the 2017 death of an Orlando police officer could go on trial a week from tomorrow. (Orlando Sentinel)

• St. Augustine shares a scary trend this year with Gainesville: Guns continue to be stolen from unlocked cars in and around St. Augustine. (WUFT News, St. Augustine Record)

• One hundred and five years ago, Florida managed to dodge a bubonic plague sweeping through the tropics. (Florida & Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project)

• A police department in Sarasota County is taking a new approach to drug enforcement by using yard signs. (Orlando Weekly)


From NPR News

• World: India Announces Widespread Ban Of E-Cigarettes

• Business: Fed Cuts Interest Rates To Keep Economy Strong, Chairman Powell Says

• Arts & Design: Frank Lloyd Wright, But DIY: A Rare ‘Usonian Automatic’ House Is For Sale

• National: Public Libraries May Turn The Page For Colorado City’s News Desert

• Race: Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau Apologizes For Brownface Costume

• Politics: California Vows To Take Trump To Court Over Emissions Standards

• National: Pennsylvania State Senator Resigns After Arrest On Child Porn Charges

• Education: New Mexico Proposes Free Tuition For All State Colleges

About Ethan Magoc

Ethan is a journalist at WUFT News. He's a Pennsylvania native who found a home reporting Florida's stories. Reach him by emailing emagoc@wuft.org or calling 352-294-1525.

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