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The Point, Aug. 9, 2019: These Three Alachua County Schools Most Need More Effective Teachers

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Today’s top stories

“We are in trouble,” an Alachua County School Board member says of the district’s struggle to move more effective teachers into three of its poorly performing schools in East Gainesville. (WUFT News)

• Prosecutors this week presented a video recording of a detective’s interview with Nelson Armas shortly after his ex-girlfriend Hannah Brim went missing in 2016. In other proceedings during the first-degree murder trial, a crime scene investigator from the Alachua County Sheriff’s Office also showed evidence gathered from a burn pit at Armas’ residence. The trial will continue today and into next week. (WUFT News)

• The high-profile civil case stemming from a 2014 beating of a suspect by Marion County Sheriff’s deputies will reach trial in January. We covered the federal sentencing of the four deputies in 2016. (Ocala Star-Banner, WUFT News)

• The Gainesville City Commission’s emails will remain publicly viewable for now, but commissioners did decide to make changes to public comment periods at their meetings. (WUFT News)

• The Marion County School District will most certainly have a new superintendent in 2021. (Ocala Star-Banner)

• A state representative wants to try once more in 2020 to allow concealed carry on campus. (Florida Politics)

• The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration yesterday came out with a new hurricane season forecast, which suggests a heightened need to be prepared during the rest of the year. (WUSF)

• If you’re worried Florida’s election system isn’t as secure as it should be, this story will not ease your mind. (Vice)

• A new way to fight red tide: trenches for sawdust and wood chips? (Sarasota Herald-Tribune)

• That Jacquie Garvey has been able to hold down a role in the Actors’ Warehouse production of “Fuddy Meers” in Gainesville is remarkable. Born with cystic fibrosis, she’s had a double-lung transplant, a stroke and near-death experiences. “Seriously,” the 67-year-old told Gainesville Downtown, “I shouldn’t even be alive at this age.”


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From NPR News

• Science: Experts On Climate Change Say How We Use Land To Grow Food Needs To Change

• Science: Researchers Are Trying To Find A Solution To Cut Concrete’s Carbon Emissions

• National: 5 Years After Michael Brown Shooting, Slow Signs Of Progress

• National: Some 300 Arrested In Mississippi Immigration Raids Have Been Released, Officials Say

• Business: Users Can Sue Facebook Over Facial Recognition Software, Court Rules

• Politics: Senate Will Discuss Gun Proposals In September, McConnell Says

• Politics: Why Is The Census Bureau Still Asking A Citizenship Question On Forms?

About Ethan Magoc

Ethan is a journalist at WUFT News. He's a Pennsylvania native who found a home reporting Florida's stories. Reach him by emailing emagoc@wuft.org or calling 352-294-1525.

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