Home / The Point / The Point, April 10, 2019: Alachua County Commissioners Begin To Take Action On Dog Attacks, I-75 Crashes

The Point, April 10, 2019: Alachua County Commissioners Begin To Take Action On Dog Attacks, I-75 Crashes

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• With the rise of dog attacks in Alachua County, county commissioners last night voted unanimously in favor of multiple solutions to help combat this issue. If a pet owner fails to care for his or her pet in any way including the pet attacking someone else, they will be placed on the irresponsible pet owner list after three violations. People on this list would be required to microchip and spay or neuter their pet in order to keep it. (WUFT News)

• Another hot topic before the Alachua County Commission yesterday: Crashes on Interstate 75. Multiple public safety agency heads spoke of the data and solutions related to the ongoing problem. There have been 77 fatal crashes on I-75 in Alachua County alone during the past five years. There’s also no single solution to limit them. (WUFT News)

• A new bill in the Florida State House would make it more difficult to get information on public universities. This includes names and select information about university presidents or provosts. The bill is titled “Public Records and Meeting/Postsecondary Education Executive Search” and, if passed, would be effective July 1. (The Alligator)

• Former University of Florida employee Daniel Joseph Sanetz was sentenced to 18 months in prison for sexually assaulting a young girl. UF paid Sanetz $21,000, which was money still left on his contract when it was not renewed. (Gainesville Sun)

• The Alachua County Commission chose its original candidate to acquire Camp McConnell in Micanopy. The commission agreed to have negotiations with a company named Basecamp Ventures Inc. on Tuesday. The lease would be $100,000 annually for 12 years. (Gainesville Sun)

• The Golden Peanut Co. branch in High Springs is no more. After more than 80 years in the city, it closed on Friday. (WUFT News)


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Around the state today

• With rising sea levels, more cities in South Florida are joining the list of cities trying to stem the tide.  This puts South Florida at the forefront of global climate change dangers, and counties have begun to put plans in place — some of which include vast amounts of money and resources. (Sun Sentinel)

• A 14-year-old Fort Lauderdale student has been arrested for the false 911 call about a potential school shooter that resulted in the lockdown of Dillard High School and Dillard Elementary School for 3 hours. (Miami Herald)

• Formerly known as the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel and Marina, along with the new name Tampa Marriott Water Street, the hotel had a makeover worth $50 million. This includes the addition of a Starbucks and new furniture. It is scheduled to open in 2021. (Tampa Bay Times)

A Keys sushi restaurant failed to pay its employees overtime and owes $72,425, according to the federal government. The U.S. Department of Labor said yesterday the company did not abide by the Fair Labor Standards Act and hired people through an agency called Phoenix ADB Services. (FLKeysNews)

Gov. Ron DeSantis announced that Collier County will receive $40.9 million for reimbursements after Hurricane Irma. “This will be used to reimburse the county for removing more than 3 million cubic yards of debris,” he said. (WINK News)

• The state education department launched a new platform where teachers and other administration give feedback on Math and English Language Arts standards for each grade level. This opens the doors for public input across the state and county. (WJCT)


News from NPR

• National: Texas Tech Medical School To End Use Of Race In Admissions

• National: Trump Administration Mulls Tougher Immigration Policies Amid DHS Shake-Up 

• World: 14 Are Reported Killed In Sudan As Protesters Call For End To President’s Rule

• World: Israel Votes On Netanyahu’s Political Future 

• Politics: Trump’s Goal To Get Tougher On Immigration Will Have To Involve The Flores Settlement 

• Business: Bank Of America Raising Its Minimum Wage To $20 An Hour

• Health: New York Declares Health Emergency As Measles Spreads In Parts Of Brooklyn

About Precious Polycarpe

Precious is a reporter for WUFT News who can be reached by calling 352-392-6397.

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