Home / The Point / The Point, Feb. 5, 2019: 2018 Brought The Most Expensive Election Campaign In Florida’s History

The Point, Feb. 5, 2019: 2018 Brought The Most Expensive Election Campaign In Florida’s History

By


Subscribe to The Point, arriving in your inbox Monday through Friday at 8 a.m.



The top stories near you

• State Rep. Stan McClain wants to see state funding for Ocala-area water projects and is requesting more than $4 million during this year’s legislative session that begins next month. Here’s some background on what’s been done so far and what he still seeks. (WUFT News)

• The University of Florida is still eager to hire at least 500 new faculty members by August of this year. The school plans to do so in hopes of being ranked a top-five public university. (The Gainesville Sun)

• Three of Gainesville’s four mayoral candidates discussed issues facing the city as part of a UF College Democrats event last night. (The Alligator)

• The head of Gainesville’s department in charge of duties like permitting, planning and annexation has resigned. While battling breast cancer and being states away from her husband, Wendy Thomas decided she was ready to move on. “It just seemed to be the right time,” she told The Gainesville Sun.


Today’s sponsored message

Crime Prevention Security Systems has more than 40 years of experience in providing peace of mind for businesses and families in North Central Florida. With its free app, local monitoring and state of the art security equipment, Crime Prevention is the local leader in security systems and home technology. Upgrade your existing system now for remote access to your security, lights, locks and thermostats – from your smartphone or tablet. Call 352-376-1499 or visit www.cpss.net.


Around the state today

• In 2018, the U.S. Senate race doubled Florida’s previous record for campaign costs. The final total was almost $205 million. (Florida Politics)

• Florida doctors and dentists will face repercussions if they do not comply and take a two-hour education course on proper opioid prescribing, and so far only 74.2 percent of these professionals have complied. (News Service of Florida)

• Gov. Ron DeSantis is pushing for an increase in scholarship funding for children ages 3 to 22 with special needs. He has proposed a $91.3 million budget that could take about 2,000 families off the Gardiner Scholarship waiting list. (Florida Politics)

Three Parkland parents will be attending President Donald Trump’s State of the Union Address. They were invited by Florida’s members of the U.S. Senate or House to sit in the House chamber and listen to the president’s address tonight. (Miami Herald)

• A Pensacola antique mall is in hot water after having a KKK figurine for sale. An African-American woman was shopping at Uncle Billy’s antique shop when she noticed an offensive item, and after questioning the store manager, the response was that it was a part of American history. (Pensacola News Journal)

• “These collectibles are symbolic of an era when we didn’t know much.” The dolphin exhibits that created a craze for Florida tourists dating back to the 1940s are now either closing or becoming less of an attraction due to the push to keep these mammals out of captivity. (Collector’s Weekly)


News from NPR

• National: 5 Die As Plane Breaks Apart, Crashes Into Neighborhood In Southern California

• National: Virginia’s Governorship Is In Turmoil As Northam Faces Calls To Resign

• National: Some Groups In L.A. Are Turning To Community Land Trusts For Affordable Housing

• World: El Salvador Elects New President, Breaking Decades-Long Control By 2 Parties

• World: It’s Unclear How Humanitarian Aid Will Get To Those Who Need It In Venezuela

• World: Qatar Changes Plan, Decides To Use Money For Humanitarian Aid In Gaza, Not Hamas

• Politics: Pentagon Deploying 3,750 Troops To Southern Border

• Politics: Fight Over Border Wall Funding Still Looms As Trump Prepares For State Of The Union

• Business: Cryptocurrency Exchange Says It Can’t Access Millions After CEO Unexpectedly Died

About Kylie Adkins

Kylie is a reporter for WUFT News who can be reached by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

Check Also

The Point, June 19, 2019: Volunteers Work To Preserve Alachua County Cemetery From The 1800s

Some of those buried within may have been former slaves.