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Photos: Micanopy’s 42nd Annual Fall Festival

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Visitors and vendors came to Micanopy for its 42nd annual Fall Festival this past weekend.

Cholokka Boulevard was closed off to accommodate hundreds of visitors, artists, organizations, crafters and vendors.

Libby Morgan came in from Ocala to enjoy the Fall Festival with her friend. They have been coming together to the Festival for four or five years. “We like to come here every year and just browse around and look at the creations and the neat things and the good food,” she said.

Vendors sold flower bouquets, wood crafts, art, along with Greek and Thai food.

Mike and Lisa Pitts came from Alachua to sell stuffed alligators called Gator Babies. They come with a soft body clothed in Gator gear. “We did have one person who thought it was the clothes we were selling rather than the whole deal,” Mike Pitts said. This was their first year selling items at the festival.

Moi Mateny flips over grilled chicken on a stick at a tent that sells Thai food. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Moi Mateny flips over grilled chicken on a stick at a tent that sells Thai food. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Marinated lamb and chicken are cooked at the tent for Greek Flame Foods. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Marinated lamb and chicken are cooked at the tent for Greek Flame Foods. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Gary and Lili Schultz came to the Fall Festival to sell kaki fuyu and chestnuts. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Gary and Lili Schultz came to the Fall Festival to sell kaki fuyu and chestnuts. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Cross Creek Honey sells beeswax candles in different shapes. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Cross Creek Honey sells beeswax candles in different shapes. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Emily Scott purchases a vanilla chess and green tea from Caitlin Lancaster at the Mosswood Farm Store and Bakehouse, a local organic coffee and pastry shop in Micanopy. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Emily Scott purchases a vanilla chess and green tea from Caitlin Lancaster at the Mosswood Farm Store and Bakehouse, a local organic coffee and pastry shop in Micanopy. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Pat Breslin performs on stage at the Micanopy Fall Festival. Breslin is a public speaking professor at Santa Fe and usually performs as part of a duo. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Pat Breslin performs on stage at the Micanopy Fall Festival. Breslin is a public speaking professor at Santa Fe and usually performs as part of a duo. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Carlos Vegas performs at this tent at Micanopy Fall Festival. He came to Micanopy from Nashville to sell jewelry from The Wind Native American Art. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Carlos Vegas performs at this tent at Micanopy Fall Festival. He came to Micanopy from Nashville to sell jewelry from The Wind Native American Art. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Shannon Bidgood and Charles Passon write Christmas cards to soldiers. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Shannon Bidgood and Charles Passon write Christmas cards to soldiers. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Stuffed toys with real Alligator heads, hands, and feet, are sold by Mike and Lisa Pitts. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Stuffed toys with real Alligator heads, hands, and feet, are sold by Mike and Lisa Pitts. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Jayda, a student at Micanopy Area Cooperative School, sells cold water bottles for a dollar to support the fifth grade safety patrol trip to Washington, D.C. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
Jayda, a student at Micanopy Area Cooperative School, sells cold water bottles for a dollar to support the fifth grade safety patrol trip to Washington, D.C. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
These kaki fuyu, or Asian persimmons, came from Schultz and Daughter’s farm in Alachua. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)
These kaki fuyu, or Asian persimmons, came from Schultz and Daughter’s farm in Alachua. (Nicole Dan/WUFT News)

About Nicole Dan

Nicole is a reporter for WUFT News and be contacted by calling 561-543-8861 or emailing ndan@ufl.edu

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