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Celebrate Earth Day In And Around Gainesville

Kids climb and rappel from trees at a previous Earthfest at Arbor Day in the Great Outdoors event at Tuscawilla Park in Ocala. This activity will be featured again at this year's event.

Gainesville

We Are Neutral’s Earth Day Celebration

Today from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.

First Magnitude Brewing Company

1220 SE Veitch St.

Tickets are $27 at the door.

Listen to live music and bid on about 75 silent auction items while enjoying local food from Humble Pie Catering and discounted beer. Ride your bicycle there and receive $2 off admission. We Are Neutral is a nonprofit that works with businesses and events to figure out their carbon footprints and provide locally-generated carbon offsets such as planting trees, Jacob Cravey, the director of We Are Neutral, said. This is the third time the event is happening, and Cravey said tonight might be the best turnout yet. “We had over 120 people last year, so we’re expecting it to be even bigger than that this year,” he said.

Repurpose Project Runway

Tonight from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Repurpose Project

1920 NE 23rd Ave.

Free admission

A trash fashion show will feature outfits made from recycled materials. Come wearing your own recycled materials designs for the chance to win prizes. After the fashion show, there will be a dance party with DJ duo Unofficial:TIME.

Spring 2016 Native Plant Sale

Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Morningside Nature Center

3540 E. University Ave.

Free admission

This sale is open to the public. Thousands of easy-care ferns, wildflowers, shrubs, grasses and trees will be available from 12 vendors. There will be a Wildflower Walk starting at 11:30 a.m. Sally Wazny, the City of Gainesville’s Environmental Education Programs coordinator, said native plants are better to plant because they require less care, like watering and fertilizing, after they get established, which makes them more sustainable. She also said they can be better for the environment overall “When we don’t plant native plants, we tend to put in exotics and ornamentals that sometimes do nothing for wildlife and can be very invasive and take over the native wildlife,” Wazny said.

Spring Gleaning Festival & Flea Market

Saturday from noon to 4 p.m.

Repurpose Project

1920 NE 23rd Ave.

$3-5 suggested donation for entry

A variety of activities such as family-friendly games, a puppet show, live music and birdhouse making will be available. There will be refreshments from Satchel’s Pizza, Swamp Head Brewery and First Magnitude Brewing Company. A craft and flea market will feature vendors selling items such as baby chicks and bunnies, elephant compost, natural deodorant and soaps and homemade hot sauce.

TreeFest

Saturday from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Swamp Head Brewery

3650 SW 42nd Ave.

Free admission

This annual event will benefit the Alachua Conservation Trust. For every beer purchased, five trees will be planted at the Little Orange Creek Preserve in Hawthorne, Florida. Trees will also be planted for food purchases and other drink purchases. The event will feature food trucks and will have family-friendly activities such as bounce houses until 5 p.m. Live music starts at 5 p.m.

Newberry

Dudley Farm Earth Day

Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Dudley Farm Historic State Park

18730 W. Newberry Road

Free admission

This Earth Day celebration will include hands-on projects and demonstration, music by Native American flutists, earth-friendly ideas and sustainable gardening tips and activities.

High Springs

Earth Day Fundraiser

Today from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Great Outdoors Restaurant

65 N. Main St.

Free admission

To support the Howard T. Odum Florida Springs Institute, there will be live music, a springs-inspired cocktail, a special draught from Swamp Head Brewery and a book signing with author and institute founder Dr. Robert Knight on the restaurant’s patio. Ten percent of patio bar sales will go to the institute to support its mission of Florida springs restoration and preservation.

Ocala

Yoga in the Park

Today from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 1 p.m.

Fort King National Historic Landmark and Visitor Center

3925 E. Fort King Street

Free admission

Power Yoga Ocala Yoga Studio will host an hour-long yoga session surrounded by nature. Don’t forget to bring a towel or blanket to lay your mat on. Jen King, the owner of Power Yoga Ocala, said the studio planned the event to be on Earth Day to get people outside to enjoy nature and interact with other community members. “It’s beautiful,” she said. “Everything’s blooming. It’s a great time of year to get out.”

Project Spring Clean

Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Ocala National Forest

17147 E. State Road 40

Free admission

Volunteer to help clean up trash in the Ocala National Forest, which was established in 1908 and covers 673 square miles. Register to volunteer by calling the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s Regional Office at 352-732-1225.

Earthfest at Arbor Day in the Great Outdoors

Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Tuscawilla Park

300-899 NE Sanchez Ave.

Free admission

Earthfest will feature family-friendly events such as a youth fishing derby, spring cleanup, arts and crafts, youth archery and tree climbing and rappelling. There will be a tree giveaway and food truck vendors, as well as live entertainment.

Putnam County

Putnam County Earthday

Friday starting at 1 p.m. through Sunday at noon. Saturday activities from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Dunns Creek State Park

302 Sisco Road

Admission is $5 per car or $2 per person walking or biking. Camping is $10 per night.

Primitive camping is encouraged to enjoy the weekend with bonfires and music. On Saturday, there will be live entertainment as well as pony rides, guided nature hikes, boat rides, kids games, craft and food vendors and wagon tours. Kayak tours can be reserved online on eventbrite.com. Sam Carr, the president of Friends of Dunns Creek State Park, said it’s important to keep kids of all ages involved. “If we don’t teach them to care for our nature, then we’re in worse trouble than we are now,” he said. Carr said the park is hoping for 400 people to attend.

About Melissa Smith

I am a journalism and sustainability studies student at the University of Florida.

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