Diabetes Day spotlights proper management of the condition

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Hannah Becker is a senior at the University of Florida. She’s also a diabetic.

Becker was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was 10 and has been learning how to control the condition since then.

“I definitely put it towards exercise,” said Becker, who realized during her sophomore year at UF how important exercise can be. “I would recommend it to everyone, but especially to diabetics if they want to control their blood sugars better.”

Desmond Schatz, M.D., director of the UF Diabetes Center, said diet and exercise are important at all stages.

“Our efforts are really directed in terms of prevention of reducing obesity, changing nutritional behavior and enhancing exercise,” Schatz said.

Becker is one of 26 million people across the U.S. with diabetes and one of 347 million worldwide.

About Maggie Schwartzman

Maggie is a reporter who can be contacted by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

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