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Donation-based book sale to begin Saturday

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The Friends of the Library will be holding its biannual book sale starting this week and will sell books, artwork, magazines and other forms of media.” credit=”Emily Burris / WUFT News

Friends of the Library in Alachua County will hold its fall book sale beginning Saturday and continuing until Wednesday.

According to the group’s website, the donation-based sale is one of the largest of its kind in Florida and has more than 500,000 books, records, games audio, video, paintings, posters and much more.

“The idea is to recycle donated books back into the community and we try to make them reasonable, a good bargain,” said Peter Roode, president of Friends of the Library.

Most prices range from 25 cents to $4 and books range from classical and modern fiction to comic books and manga, the website said. Volunteers staff the sale and sort through the items during the year, Roode said.

“They’re all book lovers,” Roode said. “They’re all very dedicated. They put in an incredible number of hours and I sort of look at this as a family.”

Linda Connell is one of these “family” members and has worked as a volunteer for more than 30 years.

“People know what they contribute to this book sale and will go back into helping their community too,” Connell said.

According to the website, customers are encouraged to bring their own boxes to collect books. Only cash or check is accepted at the event and pre-sales of books are not available.

Roode said customers love to come to the sale and pick up books.

“It’s just that indefinable feel of having a book in your hands and knowing that it was owned by somebody before you and you can share it with everybody,” he said. “Just pass it on.”

Emily Burris contributed to this story.

About Kelsey Meany

Kelsey is a reporter who can be contacted by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

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