Guardian ad litem program advocates can now transport children

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The Guardian ad litem program’s trained volunteer advocates are now eligible to transport the abused and neglected children they serve through Florida’s foster care system. Circuit Dirctor for the eigth judicial circuit Guardian ad Litem Paul Crawford says the transportation policy allows children to experience normal every day activities that they would otherwise miss out on.  [audio:http://www.wuft.org/media/audio/Crawford1gal.mp3]

Crawford adds that the volunteers do everday normal activities with the children, which promotes a stronger relationship between the pair.  [audio:http://www.wuft.org/media/audio/Crawford2gal.mp3]

Crawford explains that the volunteers are each only responsible for a small number of children.  [audio:http://www.wuft.org/media/audio/Crawford3gal.mp3]

Overall, Crawford believes that the transportation program improves the important relationship between the volunteers and children.  [audio:http://www.wuft.org/media/audio/Crawford4gal.mp3]

Guardian ad Litem  has a local office in all 67 florida counties, including Alachua and Levy, and is still trying to represent all 10,000 abused and neglected children currently without a volunteer. Those interested in becoming a volunteer can visit  www.guardianadlitem.com.

 

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