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For Apollo 11’s 50th Anniversary, The Washington Monument Becomes A Rocket

By Shuran Huang NPR

The Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing with a life-size projection of the Saturn V rocket on the Washington Monument on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

The Saturn V rocket is now iconic for carrying the Apollo 11 crew to the moon in 1969. The projection-mapping artwork will occupy 363 of the monument’s 555 vertical feet.

On Friday and Saturday, the semi-centennial show will switch to a 17-minute film that re-creates the Apollo 11 launch.

Congress authorized the display on June 20.

“Through House Joint Resolution 60, Congress requested a one-time series of arrangements for displays on the National Mall and the Washington Monument to showcase this incredible achievement in our nation’s history, and we’re pleased to partner with the National Air and Space Museum so all can relive the moment,” Interior Secretary David Bernhardt said in a museum press release.

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