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Crime Lab Analysts Testify In Pedro Bravo Trial

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Florida Department of Law Enforcement analyst Marianne Hildreth testifies during Pedro Bravo's murder trial in courtroom 1B of the Alachua County Criminal Justice Center Tuesday, August 12, 2014. Bravo is accused of killing University of Florida student Christian Aguilar. (Doug Finger/The Gainesville Sun)
Florida Department of Law Enforcement analyst Marianne Hildreth testifies during Pedro Bravo’s murder trial in courtroom 1B of the Alachua County Criminal Justice Center Tuesday, August 12, 2014. Bravo is accused of killing University of Florida student Christian Aguilar. (Doug Finger/The Gainesville Sun/Pool)” credit=” 

Florida Department of Law Enforcement crime lab analysts testified Tuesday about evidence collected in the murder trial of Pedro Bravo.

During the investigation FDLE analyst Marianne Hildreth examined pieces of duct tape recovered from the remains of Christian Aguilar and from the windshield of Bravo’s car.

Hildreth testified that she was able to determine that the duct tape recovered from the ankle of Aguilar was once part of the same roll of tape that was recovered from the windshield of the car.

FDLE analyst Greg Brock, who works with DNA, also took the stand on Tuesday. Brock said he was able to obtain a full DNA profile of Aguilar from a toothbrush.

From that toothbrush, Brock was able to confirm that blood found on items in Bravo’s car match the DNA of Aguilar.

Court resumed at 8:15 this morning and will adjourn at noon. For more updates follow us on Twitter at WUFT Pedro Bravo and you can also watch our live stream of the trial.

 

About Rebecca Kopelman

Rebecca is a reporter for WUFT News who may be contacted by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news @wuft.org

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