VIDEO: Horse Protection Association Of Florida

By on April 30th, 2014

When Morgan Silver moved her horse rescue operation to about 150 acres in Micanopy in July 2001, she was never made aware of the potential problems to come.

The plot of land in northwest Marion County was in the middle of a drought before the Horse Protection Association of Florida began noticing problems with flooding just a couple of years later. And the organization began having trouble again as 2013 rolled into 2014.

In super wet seasons there were areas that were mucky, but nothing like it has been this year,said Silver, CEO and Executive Director of HPAF.

Silver said abscesses are some of the more serious potential long-term problems the horses face. These abscesses are small, localized masses of pus found in the hoof and can cause enough pain for the horse to keep that foot from touching the ground — often initially appearing to have suffered a broken leg. Other complications — though typically short-lived include cracked heels and swollen legs.

In hopes of relieving the horses of these potential problems, Silver has been calling on those who own farms in the area to consider stepping up and loaning their extra spaces for some of the horses the organization has taken in.

A suitable area was found for 23 of the 67 horses about eight miles from the HPAF headquarters on January 15 — adding about $2,000 to the budget for rent. Grants and other donations have given HPAF enough time to operate at the satellite farm until about mid-May before possibly having to move the horses back to the original farm.

Donations are coming in; not as fast we need,said Silver. Its a pretty scary way to have to live not knowing what will come in.

This entry was posted in Environment and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
  • On Guard! Mosin Nagant

    As surely as water will wet us, as surely as fire will burn, the lights of liberty are found in the pages you turn: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0094KY878

  • Always Vigilant

    The primitive foreign tribes tend to be deceitful, duplicitous, and dishonest.


More Stories in Environment

Microbeads, plastic fragments found in foaming soaps and other hygiene products, pose a threat to waterways and marine life once they are washed down the drain.

Microbeads In Everyday Products Damages Ecosystems

Microbeads, like the ones found in common toothpastes and facial products, are damaging the environment more than many people know. The particles in these beads can enter oceans and rivers, disrupting marine life and causing damage to the ecosystem.

Jim Karels, director of the Florida Forest Service, recently received an award from the National Association of State Foresters for his success in doing prescribed burns in Florida.

State Forester Recognized For National Impact

A Florida forester received a national award for fire prevention. He calls prescribed burns the “single most important” land management tool in the state.

At the Alachua County Materials Recovery Facility, workers find many people are recycling aseptic containers, like a soymilk carton, into the wrong recycling bin. “We do take those, but they go in your blue bin, or in your co-mingle bin, with all the other containers,” said Jeff Klugh, recycling program coordinator at the Alachua County Public Works Waste Management Division. “They are sorted as a container, not as a paper product.”

Alachua County Ranks Seventh Statewide In Successful Recycling

Contamination in recycling has lead to deficit for the national recycling industry. Alachua County has managed to remain successful due to their dual stream system.

Bee Keeper

Florida Celebrates National Honey Month, Increases Production And Profit

The month of September is National Honey Month, which marks the end of honey collection for most beekeepers across America. Florida consistently ranks top five for honey production in the country and is seeing an increase in the number of bee colonies in the past 8 years. As a result, the state generates a $13 million annual honey profit.

The Castillo de San Marcos National Monument is a treasure that could be affected by rising sea levels.

Project Proposal To Study Effects of Rising Sea Levels In St. Augustine

The new project proposal would go into effect Oct. 1, if approved. Researchers hope to help preserve St. Augustine by highlighting vulnerable areas in infrastructure so the city is better prepared for rising sea levels.

Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments