WUFT News

Alachua County Superintendent Finalists To Answer Questions

By on April 30th, 2014

Members of the Alachua County community can meet the four finalists for Superintendent of Alachua County Public Schools. From May 5 to May 21, candidates will hold open houses to answer the public’s questions.

The schedule is:

  • Mark Rendell:  May 5,  6 to 7:30 p.m. on the fourth floor of the Alachua County Public Library, 401 E. University Avenue. Rendell has held the position of deputy superintendent for St. Lucie County Public Schools since 2013. Rendell previously served as an assistant superintendent in the same district from 2012 to 2013.
  • Fred Heid: May 12,  6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Matheson Museum, 513 E.  University Avenue. Heid has served as the chief academic officer for Duval County Public Schools since 2012. He was bureau chief for Florida Department of Education’s Bureau of School Improvement from 2010 to 2012.
  • Owen Roberts: May 14, 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Matheson Museum. Roberts was superintendent of curriculum and accountability for St. Lucie County Public Schools from 2005 to 2012. He is currently senior vice president of innovation at Beanstalk Innovation, an education technology company.
  • James Browder: May 21, 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Matheson Museum. Browder is the regional executive director for school improvement for the Florida Department of Education. He was a superintendent in Anchorage, Alaska for one year and superintendent in Lee County, Florida for seven and a half years.

For more information about the candidates and to view their applications for the position, visit the Alachua County Public Schools Superintendent applicant page.


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  • Henry Ko

    Because we tend to hear more about scientific advances, we tend to remember intellectual freedom while forgetting the less interesting, but more meaningful, freedom to do things.

  • Nancy Sierra

    If you want a superintendent who made the following comment when trying to deny a dean position to a black woman, “The college has had bad luck with out-of-state African-American candidates.” Because of this and his “my way or the highway,” attitude, he was removed from day to day operations at Edison State College, where he had been hired as a senior vice president. Just sayin.”

 

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