WUFT News

Florida Wildlife Commission Educates Community on Bear Safety

By on March 27th, 2014
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission members display props for their public meeting in the City of Gainesville’s City Hall on March 25. The meeting went over what the public wanted the commission to do about bear problems and how to deal with human-bear interactions, including bear spray (seen right).

WUFT News

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission members display props for their public meeting in the City of Gainesville’s City Hall on March 25. The meeting went over what the public wanted the commission to do about bear problems and how to deal with human-bear interactions, including bear spray (seen right).

The changing of seasons has led to Florida black bears coming out of hibernation, as well as a surge in complaints for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Earlier this year, the FWC Commission began reaching out to the public to gather their opinions on bear issues and educate them on how to prevent human-bear interactions. The final of seven public meetings in the central Florida region was held in Gainesville on March 25. More meetings will continue in other areas across the state.

This effort stems from the 2012 decision to remove black bears from the threatened species list. Although the steadily increasing population could warrant delisting, the FWC Commission created the Bear Management Plan to coordinate protection and regulation efforts, according to the FWC Commission website.

The plan divided Florida into manageable regions, or Bear Management Units. Of the seven units, the central Florida regional unit is the largest and includes Alachua, Putnam, Orange, Marion, Lake and eight other neighboring counties.

The meetings gathered local officials, nonprofit organizations and residents from the central Florida region to form the unit’s bear stakeholder group. The group will gather a few times a year with FWC Commission officials to discuss the specific issues the area has, which will help tailor the commission’s efforts from a statewide view to a local one.

Caitlin O’Connor, bear stakeholder group coordinator for FWC Commission, said each of these subpopulations has different issues.

“We also have the mix of the rural people that are interested in hunting and the urban people who don’t want to see the bears [hunted],” she said. “So even within the central bear management unit, there’s a lot of different viewpoints.”

Walter McCown (far right) answers a man’s question about the black bear’s natural range in Florida during the public meeting for the bear stakeholder group. This was one of many topics discussed at the last of seven meetings held in the central Florida region.

Kristan Wiggins

Walter McCown (far right) answers a man’s question about the black bear’s natural range in Florida during the public meeting for the bear stakeholder group. This was one of many topics discussed at the last of seven meetings held in the central Florida region.

At the March 25 meeting, several hunters expressed concerns over economic issues involved with future hunting and the cost of relocating problem bears. Others asked about conservation land, car collisions and when bears were most active.

Amanda Reese, Levy County resident and hunter, said she wanted to see how the FWC Commission was progressing.

“FWC has a big job ahead of them to try to figure out how to manage them, how to reduce interactions, what to do in the future,” Reese said.

Florida black bears took a hit to their reputation as merely nuisances this past December when one Seminole County bear sent a woman to the hospital.

“It was a mauling,” O’Connor said. “We don’t shy away from that word.”

The incident involved a woman who was attacked by a bear with cubs while walking her dog. She retreated slowly when she saw the bear, but she passed by close enough that the female bear attacked her.

O’Connor said backing away was the right thing to do, but the bear kept on after her.

Carli Segelson, spokeswoman for the FWC Commission, said keeping garbage and pet food inside is one way to prevent nuisance complaints, which make up 31 percent of calls about bears.

“The best course of action is to prevent a bear from being a problem bear,” she said. “And the best way to do that is to keep attractants away.”

According to the FWC Commission, to prevent the more than 100 vehicular bear deaths per year, the commission digs tunnels for bears to walk through under higher traffic roads, establishes speed limits and makes it clear that there are bears in the area with road signs.

Bear biologist and FWC Commission researcher Walter McCown, who has studied bears for about 15 years, said the one takeaway he wanted people to learn was respect for bears.

“I want them to value bears and value them enough to change their way of life,” McCown said.

Along with forming the groups and gathering public opinion, the next step for the FWC Commission is to make another bear population estimate, which will start this May, McCown said. The updated number will help the commission educate all the new Florida residents.

“Welcome to Florida,” O’Connor said. “We have bears.”


This entry was posted in Environment and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
  • Beatrice Pryor

    Standing against the injustice of plunder in no way implies that one regards advancement of the less fortunate as an unworthy cause.

 

More Stories in Environment

Unincorporated Citrus County Residents To Lose Some Recycling Services

Some residents in unincorporated parts of Citrus County will see new recycling rules implemented next week.


Kevlar gloves are used by Gainesville’s Northwest Seafood when filleting lionfish in order to protect against the venomous barbs.

If You Can’t Fight Them, Fry Them

Lionfish are being pushed to Florida menus following August regulation changes on the venomous invasive species’ importation. While dangerous to catch, they are easy to eat as conservation efforts try to save the reefs by increasing demand for the destructive fish.


lionfish

FWC Attempts to Reduce Lionfish Population

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is concerned with the growing population of lionfish, a destructive species of fish. The FWC hopes to start up new efforts to prevent the further spread of lionfish and work on extraction. Extraction [...]


Former governor Bob Graham (left), Jon Mills (center) and David Hart (right) from the Florida Chamber of Commerce discuss how Amendment 1 would affect Florida in front of an audience at Pugh Hall Sept. 4. Graham, a supporter of the amendment, said Florida should be viewed as a treasure to be protected instead of a “commodity,” while Hart said that passing this amendment could cause some serious implications for balancing the state budget.

Natural Resources Amendment Secures Environmental Funding But Raises Concerns

With almost one million signatures from Florida voters, Amendment 1 – also known as the Florida Land and Water Conservation Amendment – will appear on the Nov. 4 ballot, though not all parties are pleased by this development.


Signs like this one show residents of Hawthorne have serious concerns with Plum Creek Timber Company's plans for development in the area.

Hawthorne Residents Voice Concerns With Development Plans

Southeast Alachua County landowners discuss Plum Creek Timber Company’s proposal to develop parts of the city and express their concerns.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments