WUFT News

YMCA Begins Cutting Programs After Bankruptcy, Leans on Community Support

By on November 15th, 2013

Emerging from Chapter 11 bankruptcy, the North Central Florida YMCA Wellness Center must determine which programs to cut to start generating badly needed revenue.

CEO John Bonacci, who was hired last August to help save the company, recently announced the YMCA will shut down various programs, reduce facility hours and cut scholarships for at risk youth.

The facility, which has a leaky roof and is down to three operational school buses from its usual four, needs improvements, Bonacci said.

“The band-aids just aren’t cutting it anymore,” he said.

Although Perry Roofing will soon fix the dripping fixture, Bonacci has appealed to the community for more support.

So far, Bonacci said, “probably less than $1,000 has come in.”

“I certainly don’t want to take credit away from those who have stepped up and decided to give,” he said. “They’re usually the people who have the least to give, but are the first to write that check.”

Bobby Powell, who enjoys spending his afternoons at the YMCA, said he views the center as “big family” and wants to help restore it.

Powell and another YMCA member are pitching in with two new elliptical machines.

Powell gives, he said, because he believes the community would suffer without a YMCA center.

“If the “Y” went away, most likely I’d say 50-60 percent of these kids would go without,” he said.


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