WUFT News

$2 Million Project Begins To Restore Water Levels In Mallory Swamp

By on October 30th, 2013

Workers began restoring the water levels of Mallory Swamp in Lafayette County Wednesday.

The Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD), Department of Environmental Protection and officials in Dixie County introduced the $2 million project.

Artificial draining and drought brought down the swamp’s water levels over the years, and residents are concerned about their water supply.

“As a farmer, being able to water a crop when I need to water it determines where (or whether) I make a living or not,” said Rod Land, a local farmer.

Starting this week, geologists set up wells to help manipulate water levels in the swamp and aquifer.

“We’re trying to rehydrate it first,” said Tom Greenhalgh, a geologist from Florida Geological Survey. “Then, the water that comes out of it will go into the aquifer on the edges of the swamp.”

The project will expand both residential and agricultural water supplies in Lafayette and Dixie counties, according to a SRWMD press release.

Geologists are also digging up limestone and taking samples back to the lab to better understand the aquifer system. The samples are used to determine permeability, giving geologists an idea of where to place each well.

The second plan of action will be to close ditches that have caused water to flow outside the swamp’s usual boundary.

“It’s important for us to have a sustainable means of rehydrating … so that we have sustainable agriculture and sustainable natural resources,” said Ann Shortelle, SRWMD spokesperson.

Although Land believes it’s a step in the right direction, he said he doesn’t believe sustainability will last if water continues to be drained from the swamp.

“These God-created areas, such as what is now Mallory Swamp, (were) put here for a reason,” Land said. “My belief is that they (were) put here for recharge in drought times.”


This entry was posted in Environment and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Environment

Suwannee

Suwannee Lake Renovations Still Progressing

Almost two years after the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission closed Suwannee Lake to the public for renovations, some of the changes are now visible. For almost 50 years, the lake has provided a natural habitat for wildlife in […]


Barr Hammock Preserve is the most recent area where bear-human conflict has occurred in Alachua County. No one was injured in the June incident.

Experts Caution Against Bear Hunting in Alachua County

The Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission met yesterday to review a proposal which would allow bear hunting on specific areas throughout Florida. Wildlife groups question if hunting is the solution to an increasing number of bear encounters.


Swamp Head Brewery, with the help of the University of Florida's Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences department, released 300 bluegills into what will soon become a self-sustaining wetlands. Photo courtesy of Brandon Nappy.

Swamp Head Brewery Introduces Species to New Conservation

When Swamp Head Brewery moved into their new location, off Southwest 34th Street in Gainesville, in January, they saved one acre of their land for conservation. The brewery is working toward creating an environment that is reflective of their tasting room, “The Wetlands.”


Alachua County Fire Rescue Station #25 is one of the government

buildings that is getting a solar roof installed. After assessing the buildings, 24 were approved. Rebecca Rubin / WUFT News

Fire Station Is First Building In Hawthorne To Get Solar Overhaul

Alachua County Fire Rescue Station 25 will be the first county building in Hawthorne to be outfitted with solar panels. The station is one of 24 buildings determined viable for the county’s solar panel initiative, which seeks to cut energy consumption.


Screen Shot 2015-03-31 at 5.22.38 PM

Four Snake Species Added To Restricted List

A new law will make it illegal to import and sell four species of snakes across state lines. These snakes include one type of python and three types of anacondas, which if introduced could pose a threat to local ecosystems.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments