WUFT News

Where To Donate Clothes For Gainesville Homeless As Temperatures Drop

By on October 29th, 2013

As temperatures drop in North Central Florida, Alachua County Coalition for the Homeless and Hungry advises the community not to drop donations downtown, but rather bring them to the shelters accepting donations.

Theresa Lowe, executive director of the Alachua County Coalition for the Homeless and Hungry said people will often bag winter clothing and put the bags in Bo Diddley Plaza to give them to the homeless who frequent the area.

She advises against this.

“What happens is folks will go through and take what they need and whatever is left there just becomes garbage,” she said.

Instead, she wants the community to donate through a homeless service provider society or another organization that will provide coats and blankets to people free of charge.

The coalition is accepting coats, jackets, scarves, blankets and anything else that can keep those who are either homeless or from low income families warm this winter.

“The rest of the week is pretty much in the fifties at night. That is pretty cold if you’re sleeping outside,” Lowe said.

Other than her organization, she recommended the Lazarus Restoration Ministries, the St. Francis House, the Library Partnership and Salvation Army.

Though the numbers won’t be in until January, Lowe believes there are more homeless people in Alachua County this year than previously. This makes demand for winter wear even higher.

She said the greatest need is for larger sized men’s clothing items.

“We have people who are very generous in our community, and we’ve had the entire porch filled up with coats and blankets from just one donation,” Lowe said.

Alachua County Coalition for Homeless and Hungry, at 703 NE 1st St. in Gainesville, accepts donations throughout the season.


This entry was posted in Local and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Local

New Digital Map Launched to Decrease Hunger In Florida

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is fighting to decrease hunger and sustain the health of Florida residents. The FDACS has created a new digital map to help locate and determine which areas of Florida have the least amount of access to food and resources.

The FDACS recently launched a map to allocate resources in the state and to the most needy communities. The map took a year to be completed. Agencies that will benefit from the new technology are local food banks, food pantries, farmers market, nonprofit organizations etc.

The map uses geographic information systems, such as Google Maps, press secretary of the Department of Agriculture Erin Gillespie said in a phone interview last week. The map is supposed to connect those in need of fresh food with farmers.


Additional Parking, Lighting and Community Access Planned For Midtown Area

The Community Redevelopment Agency plans to break ground next year on NW First Avenue, the street a block north of University Avenue bordering the businesses in Midtown.

The CRA board approved the project Sept. 15, which is halfway through the design phase, to move forward with the final steps before construction.

The 10-month project will double vehicle, scooter and bicycle parking, add lighting and landscaping, redo the sidewalks and place utility lines underground, according to CRA project manager Susan Wynn.


The Waldo City Council met Tuesday night to vote on disbanding the local police department. After hearing from residents and officers, the Waldo City Council disbanded the department due to lack of funding.

Waldo City Council Votes To Disband Local Police Department

The Waldo City Council voted 4-1 in favor of dissolving the local police
department on Tuesday night. The city noted negative publicity and outdated equipment as concerns, but ultimately, it was a lack of funding that led to the disbanding the police department.


Do Local Charities Deserve Your Money Or Trust?

According to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, some charities spend as much as 99 percent of funds raised to help fulfill their mission statement while others funnel the same portion into administration costs.


The Gainesville Regional Utilities administration building is located at 301 SE 4th Ave. in Gainesville. GRU customers can expect  increased energy costs starting Wednesday.

GRU Rates Rise Despite Cost Cuts

Gainesville residents and businesses can expect increased energy costs starting Wednesday. The increase comes despite Gainesville Regional Utility lowering its base rates and cutting fixed costs.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments