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GPD Responds To Residential Complaints, Installs Speeding Radar

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“Drive like your kids live here.”

That’s what residents who live along Northwest 31st Drive expect from drivers when they make a trip down the road.

Residents have voiced concerns to city officials about drivers speeding in the area.

In response, Gainesville Police Department set up a radar on the street last week to find out how fast drivers are going. GPD hopes that if drivers see their speed, they will be less tempted to go over the limit.

During the test, 10 percent of drivers recorded went more than five miles over the speed limit. Still, it could take longer than six days to notice a problem, said GPD Sgt. Joe Raulerson, who is part of the department’s traffic team.

“They’re complaining for a reason,” Raulerson said. “They want their neighborhoods as safe as possible… Anything over 25 miles an hour is too fast.”

“I’ve had several complaints,” said James TenBieg, Westwood Middle School’s principal. TenBieg agreed with residents who say there’s been a serious problem with speeding on that street.

The monitor has helped, he said, but once school gets out, drivers tend to speed.

“Put some motorcycle cops out there, and ticket people and control it,” said Ira Elrich, who frequents the area often.

Raulerson will present the findings of the speeding survey to the City Commission Wednesday afternoon, where the commission will decide if it wants to take further action.

About Ethan Magoc

Ethan is a journalist at WUFT News. He's a Pennsylvania native who found a home reporting Florida's stories. Reach him by emailing emagoc@wuft.org or calling 352-294-1525.

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