WUFT News

Some College Students, Americans Unaware Of Upcoming Health Care Changes

By on October 4th, 2013

Beginning in January, all Americans will be required to have some form of health insurance or will pay a fine.

According to a recent Gallup poll, most Americans are unaware of the upcoming changes. Some are confused about health insurance in general.

Some University of Florida students aren’t informed about their current health insurance. UF student Sarah Beauchamp said she can’t explain what kind of insurance she has, while UF student Marylander Menard said she was unaware of the fine if she fails to get health insurance by the January 1 deadline.

The Florida Public Interest Research Group launched a campaign to educate young adults on the Affordable Care Act. Students gathered holding signs, offering tips with information that many people are unaware of, including the fact that insurance companies can’t turn someone away for pre-existing conditions.

Florida Public Interest Research Group representatives stressed the importance of being informed regardless of how healthy a person is. Dalyn Houser, a program associate from the research group, said it’s important for young people to realize they are not invincible. Anything can happen at any time.

Last year, 15 percent of Americans did not have health insurance, and this year, 20 percent of UF students are uninsured.

UF senior Jose Cardona said he fractured his leg in 2012 while playing basketball at the gym. Cardona had no way of paying his hospital bills, he said.

People can research health insurance plans online at HealthCare.gov. Some, including students, may qualify for financial assistance, but the average monthly cost for coverage under the act will be $328. People under the age of 26 can choose to be added to or remain on their parents’ insurance plan.

Those who choose to remain uninsured will face a fine. In 2014, that fine will either be $95 or 1 percent of a person’s income, depending on which is higher. In 2016, that fine will go up to 2.5 percent or $625 per adult.


This entry was posted in Health and Science and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Health and Science

Drone

UF Ph.D. Students Developing Brain Robot Interaction Technology

Two 25-year-old Ph.D. students at the University of Florida are developing software to control machines to be used as life-enhancers to any operator. The purpose of Brain Computer Interface technology is be an assistant to humans on an everyday basis, especially those with disabilities.


Molly McCann, 66, traps a wild calico cat Sunday evening. She works with Operation Catnip, a local organization that cares for Gainesville’s community cat population by spaying or neutering and vaccinating them before releasing them back to their turfs.

Operation Catnip Launches Website, Educates On Trap And Neuter Methods

Gainesville non-profit dedicated to sterilizing and vaccinating stray cats creates a website to help other communities take care of un-owned cats.


The Florida Department of Children and Families recently included a new heat map on their child fatality website. The heat map shows communities in Florida affected by child fatalities.

Rise In Duval County Infant Fatalities Increases Need For Awareness And Transparency

Infant fatalities are on the rise in Duval County, but the Department of Children and Families is strategizing how to bring awareness to parents and caretakers about unsafe sleeping practices. It has made resources and information available to the community about past child fatalities and how to prevent them.


dogpalsy

Community Provides Companion For Cerebral Palsy Child

Olivia Pitts, 3, has lived with cerebral palsy her whole life. Now, her community has pulled together to provide her with a service dog..


Jessica Grobman, born HIV-positive, said she believes better sex education in Florida schools would help children grow up safer and healthier. “If education was just more encouraged, it definitely could be a great outcome,” she said.  Photo courtesy of Jessica Grobman.

HIV Positive Student Advocates Comprehensive Sex Education

Jessica Grobman was born with HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. But it was not until she learned about HIV and other sexually transmitted infections in middle school that she began to understand she was different.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments