WUFT News

Homeowners Frustrated By Increase In Flood Insurance Rates

By on October 4th, 2013

The higher prices went into effect Tuesday, but many are still voicing their distaste for the new law.

“We pay insurance, insurance and insurance,” said Gainesville homeowner Luisa Peña. “Everything keeps going up, property insurance, taxes, but incomes don’t.”

Policies could jump by more than 400 percent, but the new rates will mainly effect those with subsidized rates who pay less than “true value” for their flood risk.

“Depending on the area of where you live, it can be hundreds or thousands. I would say if you’re in a coastal community it’s going to be a lot more than it would be than a place inland such as Gainesville, such as Alachua County,” said Bryan Williams, a McGriff-Williams insurance adviser.

The National Flood Insurance wants to collect more from those who have been underpaying to bring down their $24 billion deficit.

Another big concern among those who oppose the rate hike is how it will affect Florida’s real estate market.

“Every time there’s one of these changes it makes the real estate job that much more complicated and difficult,” Coldwell Banker M. M. Parrish Realtors president Michael Kitchens said. “Time will tell to see what the shake down is.”

As the debate continues, some homeowners hope lawmakers will reconsider raising rates for people who don’t live in heavily flooded areas.

“Evaluate the areas, the land, what are the chances of them re-flooding again. Put a little bit on the city to make sure the pipes, the system to alleviate water when it rises is in place properly,” Peña said.

Homeowners who have flood insurance won’t have to worry about the changes until their policies expire.


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  • bubba

    Flood insurance is now only for the rich

 

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