Gov. Scott Rejects Common Core Testing Standards

By on September 24th, 2013

Gov. Rick Scott announced Monday his decision to distance Florida from the common core standards movement, at least when it comes to testing.

He wants the Florida education system to determine its own testing methods, and not rely on the Partnership of Readiness for College and Careers.

According to its website, PARCC is a partnership of 18 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands working together to create standardized K-12 assessments.

Some Gainesville educators said Gov. Scott’s decision will waste millions of dollars spent developing the partnership, and could leave Florida with a different test that costs more and is not comparable.

Alachua County school board member Eileen Roy said, “The state of testing in the state of Florida has been you know totally absurd.”

Roy also said parents are tired of the frenzy over ever-changing tests their children have to take.

Toward the end of April, more than 27,000 students take standardized tests and there’s much debate on whether they are beneficial.

Assistant principal for curriculum at Buchholz High School Jared Taber said, “Over the years ever since we’ve had FCAT, you know it seems like the tests changed and some of the standards have changed.”

Taber said the changes each year make it difficult for teachers, students, parents and school administrators to follow.

The state, Roy said, needs to allow a test to stay consistent and work to have scores improve over the years.

“Florida tends to want to do things quickly and you know it’s going to be difficult each time it’s given anywhere,” Roy said.

The governor’s move means Florida will now have to rush to have its own assessment up and running in time for the 2014-2015 school year.

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