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Holy Trinity Episcopal Church Rings Bell To Celebrate 50th Anniversary Of MLK Speech

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Alicia Antone of Matheson Museum, rang the bell while having a good laugh with Jeremy Hole, associate priest of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, and other parishioners.
Alicia Antone, left, of Matheson Museum rang the bell while having a good laugh with Jeremy Hole, associate priest of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, and other parishioners.” credit=”Michael Pappa Jr. / WUFT News

The bells rang at the Holy Trinity Episcopal Church on NE 1st Street at 3 p.m. Wednesday, in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

The church took part in a nationwide ringing of the bells, which occurred at 3 p.m., all over the country.

Parishioners and the public were welcome to come and ring the bell.

They planned on ringing the bell for three minutes, but they kept it going for about 10 minutes.

Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, 100 NE 1st St., Gainesville - The bell is located inside the tower (where the green doors are).
Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, 100 NE 1st St., Gainesville – The bell is located inside the tower (where the green doors are).” credit=”Michael Pappa Jr. / WUFT News

Carolyn Horter, the church’s historiographer, helps create the church’s history by documenting each event. She was there taking pictures, and also ringing the bell with fellow parishioners.

Horter said that the church burned down in 1991, but the original bell tower and the bell were saved.

The original bell was put up with the church in the early 1900s, Horter said. Because it was saved in the fire, they are still able to use it today.

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